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I'm not certain but I think cylinders are pretty expensive. There are companies that will replate the cylinders with Nikasil, provided the wear isn't too bad in any particular area. I don't know the specifics of the process or whether it's cost effective or not. A quick search using Bing allowed me to locate this site: NiCom (Nikasil) Cylinder Coating and Repair - US Chrome
It may be worth a phone call and talking to them before buying a new cylinder.
 
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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
I'm not certain hut I think cylinders are pretty expensive. There are companies that will replete the cylinders with Nikasil, provided the wear isn't too bad in any particular area. I don't know the specifics of the process or whether it's cost effective or not. A quick search using Bing allowed me to locate this site: NiCom (Nikasil) Cylinder Coating and Repair - US Chrome
It may be worth a phone call and talking to them before buying a new cylinder.
I made some calls today and yes they are expensive.I am leaning toward taking the motor apart down to the crank and rods and that way I can inspect for wear and replace what is necessary.Its also the recommended way to install the pistons and rings as its very tricky to get the pistons and rings up into the cylinders while the base is not split.I saw a guy on youtube do it but it looks trick .If the pistons went up at the same time like the 800's it would be a joke.
 

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Before you get in too deep you might want to give nFlow a call and see how much they want for a rebuild. They are a reputable rebuilder and if they can do it for the same price, or nearly so as you can do it yourself, and offer a warranty it may be a good choice.
Personally, I am one who enjoys doing things like rebuilds, however I am also one who studies economies of things. Even though I'm retired I feel that my time is worth something and I have lots to do. All things being equal, if costs are similar, or nearly so, and I can get a warranty and a professional rebuild from a reputable place I'll go that route rather than doing it myself.
Disclaimer: I have no affiliation nor personal experience with nFlow, nor do i profit from sending customers their way.
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
Before you get in too dep you might want to give nFlow a call and see how much they want for a rebuild. They are a reputable rebuilder and if they can do it for the same price, or nearly so as you can do it yourself, and offer a warranty it may be a good choice.
Personally, I am one who enjoys doing things like rebuilds, however I am also one who studies economies of things. Even though I'm retired I feel that my time is worth something and I have lots to do. All things being equal, if costs are similar, or nearly so, and I can get a warranty and a professional rebuild from a reputable place I'll go that route rather than doing it myself.
Disclaimer: I have no affiliation nor personal experience with nFlow, nor do i profit from sending customers their way.
I have contacted them but i live in canada and it would be a hassle getting one now with covid and shipping mine back etc...I have a shipping address in the usa but we cannot get over to get them or even get someone travelling for essential work to pick it up for me.Once i get it apart and take inventory of what i need .I will make a decision then as to remanufactured vs me rebuilding.Im off work due to having lyme disease and its nice to have something to do since i had lost interest in everything due to this horrific disease.It will ruin your life .
 

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Just a quick question guys. Im fixing to probably rebuild a friend's 900 ranger. And reading what y'all are talking about and also looking on line for pistons and rings i have found so far...that every rebuild kit ccomes with new pistons and rings and looks like part of the head that has two cylinder sleeves. Are these motors like the old mercury motors that are chrome lined and you can bore them out,and you have to resleeve them??
 

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Heres what im getting at. Got a 900 that a guy had just rebuilt,then the owner ran down the road and it started running bad and found out the air cleaner wasn't hooked up. Will barely run and smokes like crazy. Guy wont stand behind his work,says he didn't leave it off. So brought it to me. Thinks engine is blown. I did a compression test today and had 180 in one cyl. And 130 in the other. So if the cylinder walls are ok, should i just get the piston and ring kit,along with gaskets and new tty bolts. Or should i order a whole top end rebuild kit with those cylinders. And if they are one size,then what would you bore?
 

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I can see buying a new cylinder if this one is scratched up,but what would you have bored,? Looks like they are only one size and you replace them if bad. I know there is probably upgrades,but im not talking about that, im staying stock. But are you just saying that the cylinders are made and then coated with that nikasil stuff and not a sleeve. I think i understand you now. I was making it harder than it is. So if that cylinder is messed up,i can just order a new one and replace it and pistons and other stuff in the kit. No machine shop stuff required? If i got it,just say you finally got it.
 

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Im sure people have rebuilt these motors without replacing the cylinders. But if the cylinder looks perfect,is it still recommended to replace the cylinder everytime you do a rebuild? Cause would this nikasil stuff come off the cylinder and you couldn't see it? I know what to do if its scratched or something like that, i have to replace it, but this one has been replaced, but you can't hone them out for the new rings to set, so i would think you would have to replace the cylinders everytime? What are y'all's thoughts on that? And also, i have looked at two different top end rebuild kits and the Polaris shop has a cheaper one that is made by Armortech that they offer instead of oem.And im looking at the one from rev6. They both come with everything but new tty bolts. Has anyone have any experience with either of these kits?
 

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I suggest getting a Polaris Service Manual, usually available as a download on line for about $10. There is information in the manual about rebuilds, cylinder replacement etc. If you follow those guidelines you can't go wrong.

Just for kicks I looked at my Manual for the 2015 570 & 900 and it clearly states: "NOTE: DO NOT hone the cylinders or attempt to repair a damaged cylinder by honing."

The Nikasil coating is thin and can easily be removed by honing. As far as I know, unless you want to have the cylinder re coated with Nikasil and can find special oversized pistons, boring is not an option. In the end after going through all those "gymnastics" you'll probably end up paying more than it would cost to replace a damaged cylinder and installing new pistons & rings.

There may be aftermarket kits that include the cylinder, pistons and rings, perhaps some even available with larger bore. You can do an Internet search for more info but personally, although I might opt for a quality aftermarket kit, I would maintain stock bore size if for no other reason than reliability. In my experience any time you start on the high performance quest for more power it leads to evermore modifications. I'm considerably older now and don't really want to deal with constant tinkering for more performance like I when I was in my late teens and early 20's. Even my 570 XP goes everywhere I need it to go and 99% of places a 900 would take me (deep mud may be the exception) albeit a bit slower, but I'm good with that.
 

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Thanks, but yeah i figured that when the cylinder was coated,that they couldn't be bored. In my first post i asked if the cylinders were like the ole mercury motors that had chrome lined cylinders and couldn't be bored out, they had to be resleeved. And when he said Those cylinders were bored and coated, i misread it and my mind started going different directions and i was thinking,if it was bored ,why couldn't it be done. But he was saying that the cylinder was made then coated. But anyway, I'm going to order a top end rebuild kit from rev6 and rebuild it. I checked with my Polaris shop and they said they didn't have an oem kit that i would have to piece it together and when we added it all up it was around 2100. So i told them i would order a kit off line. Then he said he found a kit from Armor tech,made here in AR. That was 875. Dallors. It came with the valve seats and everything the other kit has including the new cylinders, but i don't know much about it and its not coated in anyway that i know of. And the valve seats aren't upgraded. And the kit from rev6 has coated pistons and rings and upgraded valve seats and is only 908. Dallors. Im not going to rebuild it with more performance in mind, im just going to go back stock with better valve seats and rings. It isnt mine. It belongs to a guide at a duck club. And this is the third time its blown up. He had the motor replaced the first time,and the second,had it rebuilt and then rode it for an hour,and it started smoking and loosing power and then noticed the air box wasn't hooked up. The guy that rebuilt it, said he wouldn't do something like that, so he heard of me through a friend and here we go. Ive rebuilt several engines and several motor cycle engines and lawnmowers and have worked on a couple of rangers but never messed with a rebuild on one. But it looks about like my Toyota motor, and i know alot about them,so i should be ok. Just stuff like torque specs and stuff i could get out of a manual and so could definitely use one. He has alot of smoke and oil in both cylinders,so i bet the valve seats are bad also. That seems to be a common problem with these.
 

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Alright, got a quick question for anyone who knows for sure. Do they make oversized bearings for these engines? It doesn't seem like they do. And it seems like its just like a Toyota motor to where you match the crank and case to the bearings. But you cant have a crank turned and get oversized bearings for it? Got this motor torn down and it spun a bearing bad enough that it welded the bearing to the crank and wallowed out the case journal. And i don't think anyone will line bore these cases, so ill have to get new cases and crank and bearings anyway, but i was wondering if they make oversized bearings for these engines anyway?
 

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I ordered all the parts from rev6 and they get most of their stuff from hotrods. But there tech was telling me to reuse the TTY bolts on the crank cases and that they didn't supply a new woodriff key. He said they rebuild four or five a day and they reuse the bolts. I told him that im glad i didn't buy an engine from them and i wasnt going to reuse the bolts and for the manager to call me. All this came up because they sent me the wrong timing chain and i didn't find that out till i had it all together, almost. I had checked everything and the chain was a hair smaller than mine,but i thought my old one could have stretched. But it didn't look like it set right on the cam sprockets. So i took a pic and sendt it to them and they asked a few questions and said it was the wrong chain. So they sent me another one,which was also wrong and im waiting on the 3rd one, along with some new tappit buckets i ordered from the local Polarisshop. I couldn't find any breakin oil,so im using that Lucas breakin additive along with regular oil. I use it in new car motors and have good luck. But once i get the chain and stuff in and get it together and installed back in the ranger, is there anything yall do special to prime the fuel system or anything i need to do? Ill pull the plugs and crank it for a little and make sure that oil is getting pump up,and im hoping that will give it enough time to pump fuel to the injectors and pressurize them. Anything yall can think of?
 

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One other thing you might consider doing is replacing the factory hydraulic cam chain tensioner with a manual aftermarket one if it hasn't already been done. If it was mine I would replace it especially after spending the time and money to rebuild it.

Edit: Since they sent you two incorrect cam chains I am wondering if they sent you a newer cylinder that uses the improved Polaris manual chain tensioner which bolts to the cylinder with two bolts instead of the older screw in type?
 

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Thank you for your reply. He said that the tensioner has been replaced,the last time it was rebuilt. Which was recently. Niw i didn't notice anything different about the new cylinder, when i screwed in that black piece fir the tensioner,and the tensioner does have teo small bolts that mount it to that. I don't know if its a upgraded one or not. But it has a bolt on the back that i took out and used a small flathead to turn a screw that releases tension on it,so i could put it back in. Now, i did notice that when i put my old chain back on,that ut was way too long,and it would barely put tension on the chain. And i couldn't figure out why that was. Do the new cylinders have a shorter nipple that the black piece screws into? That would make sense as to why my old chain was so long. If thats where the differences are between the cylinders than i can compare them when i get home.
 

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This is the old style that screws in for model years up through 2016 EPS.
The stock hydraulic tensioner just screws in the hole and looks like a big bolt. Aftermarket manual replacements sometimes use a screw in adapter to mount a bolt in tensioner that uses two bolts or sometimes it looks like a hydraulic tensioner with a bolt sticking out of it.
Vision care Font Automotive tire Personal protective equipment Eyewear




This is the new style that bolts in for 2017 and newer EPS.
The tensioner bolts to the cylinder. There is no adapter.
Eyewear Auto part Personal protective equipment Diving mask Goggles




This is a Polaris OE tensioner for the newer cylinder.
Household hardware Cylinder Gas Nickel Auto part
 

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This was the reason they said i had the wrong chain. They said it didn't fit right. I wasn't for sure,so i sent them this pic. I know the timing chains usually don't sit down on the sprockets like regular chains, but i wasnt for sure. But does that look normal to you?
 
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