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We transitioned from a Can-Am Maverick sport to our Ranger. Upon purchase I immediately installed new 30x10x14 Tusk Terabite Aramid tires and bead lock rims. Early on I noticed if we climbed something just a little steep in high range we got a burning rubber smell. I drove very carefully from then on to eliminate the smell. At about 700 miles the smell became more frequent and pronounced. I put in a new belt. Did 50 miles with no smell driving trail. Next day was on pavement got a 65590 error code. Dealer said 3rd party belt caused the problem. Put on new $200 Polaris belt. Went for ride following break in procedure. About 40 miles into ride on wet sand trails with some snow and shallow puddles started smelling burnt rubber again. Driving 15-25; approximately 5500 RPM, Low range 2 WD, flattish terrain. Waiting on dealer to pull belt but I am thinking with the oversized tires plus 10 ply and beadocks the additional weight is more than the stock clutch can handle. Need help, suggestions, recommendations.
 

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Gary, I am thinking it is a pretty safe bet that you would not have been burning belts with the stock rims & tires. You might look at the Duraclutch as a replacement for the stock clutch but lately I have been receiving private messages about a few issues with those as well. Nothing worse than dropping $12-1500 on a NEW vehicle to replace a lack luster OEM clutch only to have to pay hundreds more to replace clutch packs a few months later.
 

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Just as Jungleman states, High Range is your problem, along with the increased tire diameter. If you read your Operator's Maunal you'll find recommendations for vehicle speeds/ranges. For example, a quote from the Operators Manual for my 2015 570 XP states:
"Belt Life
To extend belt life, use the lowest gear possible when hauling or towing heavy cargo. Using
high gear for heavy loads, hilly terrain or in wet, muddy conditions will increase the chance
of drive belt burning. See the Drive Belt Wear/Burn section on page 95."

A partial list of causes of Belt Burn are listed here:
Drive Belt Wear/Burn
Possible Cause
Solution
Driving onto a pickup or tall Use low range during loading.
trailer in high range

Starting out going up a steep Use low range. See warnings on page 41.
incline

Driving at low RPM or ground Drive at a higher speed or use low range more frequently.
speed (3-7 MPH)

Insufficient warm-up at low
ambient temperatures Warm the engine at least 5 minutes. With the transmission in neutral, advance the throttle
to about 1/8 throttle in short bursts, 5 to 7 times. The
belt will become more flexible and prevent belt burning.


Slow/easy clutch engagement Use the throttle quickly and effectively.

Towing/pushing at low RPM/low Use low range only.
ground speed

Utility use/plowing Use low range only.


Climbing over large objects from Shift the transmission to low range and carefully use fast,
a stopped position brief, aggressive throttle application to engage clutch.

Improper break-in Always break in a new belt and/or clutch.

If you find the above recommendations do not suit your requirements then the Duraclutch is the answer. I installed one on my Ranger very soon after buying it for that very reason. Engagement is much smoother and precise, and I can use High Range far more often. Otherwise, Low Range must be used, and used more often than with OEM diameter tires.

In case you aren't aware, increasing tire diameter effectively increases final drive ratio. The OEM (Polaris) has designed the vehicle to operate correctly with the stock diameter tires. Increasing tire diameter defeats the OEM engineering. What this means to your clutch is comparable to always starting off in second gear with a manual transmission in a car or truck, requiring the clutch to be slipped until enough vehicle speed can be obtained to allow full clutch engagement. Slipping the clutch on a car or truck greatly decreases clutch life. Doing the equivalent in a Ranger greatly decreases belt life because the PVT clutch is not fully engaging fully with the belt as soon as it should causing belt burn, hour glassing and, as you have experienced, greatly decreased belt life.
 

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I spray weeds with my 900, loaded with 100gals and the only time I use low is actually spraying as it's easy to maintain 10mph and loading on the trailer. Pyro has some good points and the bottom line is learning how the CVT works as proper engagement is critical, along with maintenance. I'm still running the OEM 2016 belt with 5500miles, needs replaced now but only because it's stretched and can feel the flutter when I take off.
 
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