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This is my post 1 of 2 of my review of the King Kutter 1.5T-DT-XB (1.5 Ton Dump Trailer) Offroad-only. (https://www.kingkutter.com/store-product.aspx?id=3511)

Background (my justification for needing this trailer):
My wife loves horses. I love my wife. I buy 2 horses to make my wife love me. She does. Winter comes. Path to horses (about 1/3 mile) becomes a muddy, hellish pit. I hate mud (ok I like mud when playing in it - not fun to work through it). I decide to put in a drive by hauling in #2 stone. Conclusion: I need a heavy-duty tool to make this task more bearable / fun.

Last fall, I used my Ranger (500 EFI midsize) to haul #8 stone and dump on the path. Then spread it with a borrowed Kubota (which now lives in my barn). That worked fine, but the farther I got from the pile, the task got exponentially longer. The Ranger bed just isn't big enough (narrower than the tractor bucket so I lose part of the rocks when loading the bed) and dumping it can be a pain when its REALLY full (try doing it facing downhill). That's when I started looking at trailers online. Last weekend, I rented a full-size dump trailer but it was too big to get down the trail and too heavy to move with the Ranger. So for the first 2 tri-axle loads of #2's, we hauled the rock, one load at a time in the Ranger and Mule. Not a bad solution, but it took my whole family (6 of us) an entire Saturday to get 1/4 down the trail and we started at the rock pile so this was the fastest part of the job. The last 3/4, which is much muddier and much further away would take another 3-4 Saturdays. Hence, my interest in an offroad dump trailer was renewed. And who doesn't like to get a new tool anyway? (I can justify just about any project to get a new tool/machine).

Here are a few of the trailers I considered:

King Kutter (https://www.kingkutter.com/store-product.aspx?id=3511)
ATV Wagon 1600UT (1600 Utility ATV Wagon - Power Dump Cart, dumping ATV Trailer- Power RAM strongest, best, ultimate atv farm trailer, atv ranch trailer)
Country ATV 7550ATV (ATV Trailers Heavy Duty Tandem Axle Model 7550ATV)
Polar Trailer HD1500 TA (HD 1500 TA - Trailers)
MUTS (Multi use trailer system - MUTS - Multi-Use Trailer System for your ATV, Quad and 4 Wheeler - Welcome)
Provonost P503 (Pronovost- Dump trailers - Off-road service)
Bri-mar DT508LP-3 (DT508LP-3 - Bri-Mar)

In the end, I narrowed my selection down to 3: the KK, the ATV Wagon and the Country ATV. The others were either too expensive or didn't have the features I wanted (metal or wood dump bed with some way to mechanically dump) Here's the way I saw it:

KK Pros: 3,000lb GVWR (-600lb dry weight = 2400lbs load capacity), hydraulic cylinder dump (like a full-size dump trailer), spreader gate, dual-axle wide 8" tires
KK Cons: Expensive online prices range around $2300 or more, hydraulic dump is manual (dual direction hand pump)
ATV Wagon Pros: Electric dump, huge tires, dual, torsion suspension (great offroad ride), trailer brakes, less expensive ($1800 which is still expensive, but $500 less than the KK)
ATV Wagon Cons: only 1600 GVWR which give about 1100lbs load capacity, 2ply tires could pop under load.
Country ATV Pros: 2,500lb GVWR (350lbs dry weight = 2,150lbs capacity), hydraulic lift, great price ($900 + shipping)
Country ATV Cons: 350lbs dry weight makes me think it's not as heavy duty as the other 2, I can't validate this myself, but it was a concern. Also, the lift is rated at only 1000lbs. So I could haul over a ton, but I could not dump it (ok maybe it would work, but definitely exceeded the recommendation)

I finally decided (or so I thought) on the ATV Wagon - price was the deciding factor between it and the KK, but I had this nagging feeling about the 1100lbs load capacity. 1100lbs is not alot when you're hauling stone. I ended up speaking to the owner of Bosski, the manufacturer of the ATV Wagon. Great guy. Answered all of my questions and offered me a great deal on a scratch and dent model, and even threw in a 3yr warranty and wireless remote for the dump. With all this, the final price was somewhere in the $1800 range delivered. Still alot more than I ever thought I'd spend on a trailer like this, but after seeing the other options, this was a good deal.

But....the 1100lbs load capacity kept nagging at me. I knew I would load more than that in it. I'm also an engineer and I know there can be quite a bit of band guard used when defining the specs, especially in the litigation-rich environment that we get to live in, but I thought I might be dissatisfied with the limitation.

Then...by chance one night I stumbled across a place called "Jim's Farm Equipment". Jim, as in Mr. James Fraley, former owner of King Kutter. As it turns out he purchased King Kutter in the mid 1970's and has since sold the company to his kids. They had a trailer that looked exactly like the KK, but was called a Prohaul for $1695. Wow. That's a deal. After a few phone calls, and after speaking to Mr. Fraley directly, I learned that this location was the actual manufacturer of the trailer and they market it under many different brands (King Kutter, Prohaul, Taylor Pittsburgh, etc). And the plant was a 4 1/2 hour drive from my house. So...after verifying they had a unit in stock, at 3:45am on Saturday I set off for southeastern Ohio.

OK. Enough blabber. About the trailer.

(Continued on post 2 of 2.)
 

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2 of 2 (continued from above)

OK. Enough blabber. About the trailer.

This thing is built like a tank. 12 gauge steel built on a walking beam axle. Looking underneath and all around and it just looks like a miniaturized, full-sized dump trailer. I picked up the tongue and the word that came to mind was "stout". It includes a 2" ball hitch and a clevis hitch both of which swivel at the base to allow more rotational movement between the tow vehicle and trailer. I'm using the 2" ball hitch. The other stores conveniently under the bed. The hydraulic pump is stout as well and much to my surprise, includes the ability to connect to a remote hydraulic pump (like on the rear of a tractor). Amazingly, I only found one site that even mentioned this auxiliary ability. They had 3 orange King Kutter-branded trailers in the front lot. I was hoping for a black one, but who really cares. I'm gonna scratch all the paint off anyway. The bed measures 50"W X 70"L X 13"H. That's 26 cubit feet or just shy of 1 cubit yard. 1 cubit yard of #2 stone can weight about 3,000lbs. (1.5 tons per yard)

I loaded the trailer heaping over the top and even with the hand pump, was able to fully extend the dump bed even on a downward slope. It takes a little muscle at first, but it gets easier after the first 2-3 pumps. The hand pump works in both directions, so it makes raising much faster and less work.

The tailgate opens on top (like a pickup truck) or bottom (like a dump truck). The only modification that I added was chains on the tailgate to control the amount being spread. This is a must if you're spreading material. I drilled a hole in each lower corner of the tailgate and added 2 hooks. I'll send pics of the setup later. It works great. Also, the lever to release the cams holding the bottom of the tailgate is located at the front of the trailer. I tied a rope to it so I can release while driving. The trick is to fully extend the dump bed with the cams locked. Then start moving forward and pull the lever. Maintain a steady speed and you've got a perfectly spread layer of stone (or whatever). By moving to different chain links, I can control how much material is dropped. It only took me 2-3 dumps to get it dialed in.

Yeah, I'm exceeding the ratings of the Range by pulling the trailer fully loaded, but I'm not going far or going fast, and I'm mostly on flat or descending terrain. Our house sits at the highest point of our property and the horses are near the lowest. So it's all downhill. I'm sure if I needed to, I could pull it up also.

The wide tires don't sink too much in the mud either. I tried back spreading, but it does not work too well given the low height of the trailer. The material gets in the way as it dumps. Its also a shorter wheel base than the Ranger and is really difficult to control speed and direction in reverse. So I just spread going forward. In areas that were too deep with mud (yeah I got stuck a few times trying to drive through the muck with a 3000lb trailer!), I just backed up to the end of the path and dumped part or all of it and spread with the tractor.

So compared to using the Mule and Ranger with six people, I accomplished the same amount of work in half the time with just 1 person. Not bad.

I can't wait to haul more stuff with this thing. Even silly stuff like hauling cut wood or tree limbs will go faster. I usually spend twice as much time unloading limbs as I do loading them. They always get all twisted around each other. Now I'll just dump them and then drive over them with the next load and dump again.

Also, after the #2's are spread and settle, I'll follow with something smaller. #8's or something. That should give a smooth right and better appearance.

So, in summary, if you've ever wanted a small, offroad trailer to do trailwork, spreading, hauling, etc. I'd strongly recommend the King Kutter. And if you're lucky enough to live within driving distance. Go to Jim's Farm Equipment in Gallipolis, OH. Buy one of these things and have a blast.

Here's a couple of pictures. I'll post more when I have time. In my opinion KK does itself a disservice by not promoting this thing more. Look at their website and there are scant details. That pile of rocks in the second photo is about 2500lbs as near as I can figure. That's five full bucket loads from the Kubota (it's one of the smaller, but not the smallest buckets)





Here are the specs from Rural King's website:

  • 1.5 Ton Capacity
  • Rear Dump
  • Removable Smooth Side and End Panels
  • 2 Way Opening Tailgate
  • Swivel Clevis Hitch
  • Swivel 2" Ball Hitch
  • 18 X 8.5 X 8 Turf Style Tires
  • Walking Beam Tandem Axle
  • Single Action 3" X 12" Cylinder
  • Fold Away Tongue Jack
  • Bed Dimensions 50"W X 70"L X 13"H
  • Double Diaphragm Hydraulic Pump
 

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Sounds like a handy tool to have! Thanks for the informative (and entertaining) review. I would have thought they would cost more than that!
 

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I have been wanting one of those for rocks and brush. I did not need this temptation :)
 

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Awesome review!! Thank you!
 

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Hey Whosuregunner,

I know this is an old thread, but how has the trailer held up to a couple years of abuse? And do you have any details on the remote hydraulic pump setup you used? I'm assuming it was a 12v unit used on your ranger, correct?

Thanks for any help you can provide.
 

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I got Rural King version of this and works great. Want to add some wood sides to it so it will hold more brush but that’s about it. View attachment 124611
 
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