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Discussion Starter #1
Adding an auxiliary Fuse Box is one the first things a lot folks do. It makes it a lot easier (and safer) to add lights, radios, etc later on. This is one of many ways to do it. I used pictures rather than a schematic to make it easier to understand. This approach uses a Blue Sea fuse box and a PAC-80 relay. The only 'parts' you need to buy are:

A Blue Sea Fuse box, model 5025 for 6 circuits, or a 5026 for 12 circuits, Amazon, ebay, and a bunch of others
A PAC-80 relay, available from Amazon or ebay
An 80 amp, 12 volt circuit breaker or fuse
Some cables and wires
Some ring connectors
Some #10 sheet metal or self tapping screws to mount the circuit breaker, relay, and fuse box.
About 3 or 4 beers

Aux Fuse box 2.jpg

1. (Disconnect the Negative factory terminal from the battery before starting) First step is extend the power from your battery to the OEM terminal block under the hood. Depending on the year and model, (and in some cases, dealer installed options) yours may already be cabled. If two of the three terminals are not already wired, you will either have to order the Polaris harness or make your own. If you make your own, 4ga cable would be a good choice. Connect the red cable from the positive terminal on your battery to the outside (usually left) terminal on your OEM terminal block, and a the black cable from your negative terminal on your battery to the center terminal on the OEM terminal block. Do not fuse either one of these cables.

2. Next, select a location to mount your circuit breaker--should be pretty close to the OEM terminal block. Make up and run a red cable from the Positive OEM terminal to one of the studs on the circuit breaker. 6ga (or 4ga) would be a good choice. You can use a fuse instead of the circuit breaker but finding an in-line fuse holder for an 80 amp fuse with 6ga wires may be difficult, most come with 8ga.

3. Find a convenient location to mount the PAC-80 relay then run a red cable (6ga) from the remaining stud on the circuit breaker to one of large studs on on the relay; either one of the studs will work.

4. Select a location to mount your Blue Sea fuse box then run another red 6ga cable from the remaining stud on the relay to the bottom stud (Positive input) on the fuse box.

5. Run a smaller red wire from either one of the small studs on the relay to the Keyed Hot terminal on the OEM terminal block. Although you can go smaller, I would recommend either 14 or 16ga wire - stands up vibrations better.

6. Run another small wire (14 or 16ga black) from the other small stud on the relay to one of the small ground terminals (#8 ring connector) on the fuse box. Alternatively, you can run this wire directly to the center terminal on the OEM terminal block if it is more convenient--you'll need a larger ring connector.

7. Last step is run 6ga black cable from the center terminal on the OEM terminal block to the top (Negative buss) stud on the fuse box. Reconnect the negative battery terminal.

Testing your installation: Insert a fuse in any of the slots on the Blue Sea fuse box. With the key OFF, use a meter or test light, measure between the terminal where you put the fuse and any of the negative screws--you should get nothing. Turn the key to the ON position and do the same test, you should get ~12 volts. Note that any accessory that you connect to the Blue Sea fuse box will ONLY work if the key is ON.
 

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Very nice Forde. Seems like lots of folks keep asking for this information. Being a sticky will surely help too.
Do you have any insite into how to install a left handed turboencabulator? :encouragement:
 

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Awesome write up Forde, thanks for sharing your time and knowledge!
 

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This is great. I have been researching this for a few days now. And this is the best info I have come across. I do have two questions though. Why wouldn't you put the 80amp breaker between the battery and the OEM terminal bar...preferably closer to the battery? And lastly, what is the advantage of running a ground directly from the battery to the OEM terminal bar...couldn't you just ground to the frame?

These may be noob questions but I figure here is probably the best place to ask.

Again, thanks for this info!


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Good Stuff...........
 

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This was super simple, makes me think I could do it!
 

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image.jpeg

Just did something similar...just minus a few parts :distress: Might go back and add circuit breaker but doesn't make much sense to me unless I add it at battery to protect whole circuit and I will be adding winch so 80 amp breaker might not be enough.
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Nice, neat work Brandon! You are right, normaly you want your CB or Fuse as close to the power source as possible. In my drawing above, it is placed after the OEM terminal block for exactly the reason you state, a winch. On the older models (e.g. the 800's) the OEM terminal block is right next to the battery so it was no big deal to run the wires from the winch contactor directly to the battery. When the 900s came along, Po decided to relocate the battery back further under the seat and instead of running the wires off the winch contactor all the way to the battery, they just used OEM terminal block instead--makes it a whole lot easier to run the cables and theoretically, since the run is shorter, the wire guage doesn't have to be quite has heavy (kind of an iffy statement since the factory harness you can order is not quite 4ga either!). At any rate, you want to pretty much have full access to all the amps available to run a winch. As the table below shows, if you put an 80 amp CB between the battery and the main lugs of the contactor, you will effectively turn your 4000 lb winch into an ~600 lb winch.

viper 4000.JPG

The way you have your fuse box wired, anything you attach to it will be able to be turned on regardless of the key being on or off (unless you put individual relays on the accessories). Nothing wrong with that! I had it that way originally also. But since I have grandkids that love to press buttons, and memory that isn't quite what it use to be, I added the relay to ensure that when I walked away from the machine, everything was off. Some folks like too have the option of having some accessories key-dependent, and other accessories avail 24 hours (a Blue Sea term meaning 'hot all the time'). Blue Sea recently came out with "split" fuse box (model 5032) where 6 of the terminals are 24 hour, and the other 6 are only available with the key on. You can easily add that functionality to my drawing above by adding another wire off the output of the CB directly to the 'other' (bypassing the relay) input position on the 5032. Of course you can add a second fuse box to accomplish the same thing (cheaper that way if you already have a 5025 or 5026!).

One other thing I noticed in your picture, you used the outside lug of the OEM terminal block as your ground and the middle lug as you hot. To anyone contemplating adding an aux fuse box, it doesn't matter a bit--will work exactly the same either way. The only reason I show it the other way in my drawing is because that has been traditionally the way Polaris use to wire them from the factory.
 

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Fswan, based on your above diagram, what do you hook you winch power to? The CB, relay or fuse box? I want my winch to work only with the key on. Currently it has a wire in the remote that hooks to keyed hot so I think that will always be the way I want it. I'm just not sure what I should hook the power to. My CB arrives in the mail tomorrow. Thanks


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I was hoping to mount my winch contactor up in front under the hood, and then running the power wire back to the battery under the seat. I was planning to put a 100 amp circuit breaker right next to the battery. Then running power for the fuse block off the winch contactor. But it sounds like I can't use a cb between winch and battery.. Damn, thought I had it all figured out, but I don't want 6 feet of unfused 5 gauge wire running though my machine.
 

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Nice, neat work Brandon! You are right, normaly you want your CB or Fuse as close to the power source as possible. In my drawing above, it is placed after the OEM terminal block for exactly the reason you state, a winch. On the older models (e.g. the 800's) the OEM terminal block is right next to the battery so it was no big deal to run the wires from the winch contactor directly to the battery. When the 900s came along, Po decided to relocate the battery back further under the seat and instead of running the wires off the winch contactor all the way to the battery, they just used OEM terminal block instead--makes it a whole lot easier to run the cables and theoretically, since the run is shorter, the wire guage doesn't have to be quite has heavy (kind of an iffy statement since the factory harness you can order is not quite 4ga either!). At any rate, you want to pretty much have full access to all the amps available to run a winch. As the table below shows, if you put an 80 amp CB between the battery and the main lugs of the contactor, you will effectively turn your 4000 lb winch into an ~600 lb winch.

View attachment 55785

The way you have your fuse box wired, anything you attach to it will be able to be turned on regardless of the key being on or off (unless you put individual relays on the accessories). Nothing wrong with that! I had it that way originally also. But since I have grandkids that love to press buttons, and memory that isn't quite what it use to be, I added the relay to ensure that when I walked away from the machine, everything was off. Some folks like too have the option of having some accessories key-dependent, and other accessories avail 24 hours (a Blue Sea term meaning 'hot all the time'). Blue Sea recently came out with "split" fuse box (model 5032) where 6 of the terminals are 24 hour, and the other 6 are only available with the key on. You can easily add that functionality to my drawing above by adding another wire off the output of the CB directly to the 'other' (bypassing the relay) input position on the 5032. Of course you can add a second fuse box to accomplish the same thing (cheaper that way if you already have a 5025 or 5026!).

One other thing I noticed in your picture, you used the outside lug of the OEM terminal block as your ground and the middle lug as you hot. To anyone contemplating adding an aux fuse box, it doesn't matter a bit--will work exactly the same either way. The only reason I show it the other way in my drawing is because that has been traditionally the way Polaris use to wire them from the factory.
Now I'm confused. I have 3500lbs winch. According to this data I need over a 250amp CB. Right? I only have an 80. Am I missing something?


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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
Fswan, based on your above diagram, what do you hook you winch power to? The CB, relay or fuse box? I want my winch to work only with the key on. Currently it has a wire in the remote that hooks to keyed hot so I think that will always be the way I want it. I'm just not sure what I should hook the power to. My CB arrives in the mail tomorrow. Thanks
TacRed, The control wire you have hooked to the 'Key Hot' should stay there, or if you are installing an aux fuse box as in the drawing, it can connect to any one of fuse box outlets since the fuse box will only be active when the key is on. So for the whole winch hookup, you will have 2 cables (usually yellow and blue) coming off your winch and going to the winch contactor (not in my drawing). Then you would have another 2 cables (usually red and black) coming off your contactor and going to either the OEM terminal block under the hood, or straight to the battery. Contactors differ depending on the manufacture but usually in addition to the 4 cables (yellow, blue, red, and black [but could be any color]) there are two smaller wires that activate the contactor (the contactor contains several smaller relays that control the polarity of the current to the winch motor allowing for either 'spool in' or 'spool out' depending on the switch position) relays. Those 'control' wires require a very small amount of power as their only function is to activate the relays inside the winch's contactor.

I was hoping to mount my winch contactor up in front under the hood, and then running the power wire back to the battery under the seat. I was planning to put a 100 amp circuit breaker right next to the battery. Then running power for the fuse block off the winch contactor. But it sounds like I can't use a cb between winch and battery.. Damn, thought I had it all figured out, but I don't want 6 feet of unfused 5 gauge wire running though my machine.
Wise to be concerned about running hi-amperage cables!! However, You are certainly in the minority. Just a SWAG (Scientific WildAss Guess) on my part, but I would guess 98+% of us do not fuse (or CB) the power cable to the contactor. You certainly can, but to maintain full functionality of your winch, you would need a 300+ amp circuit breaker and even then, the typical 4 or 5 ga PVC coated could still be overdriven. One way to minimize your risk is to use SGX cross-linked polyethylene covered cable. It's pricey but a whole safer than regular PVC coated cable (https://www.kayjayco.com/catPWireSXL.htm). But regardless of type cable you use, it is far more important to pay particular attention to the duty cycle of your winch. Most folks don't realize that for a heavy pull, the duty cycle of a winch is 15:90 seconds, that is, you should run the winch for 15 seconds then let it rest for (at least) 90 seconds with the engine running. The 15 seconds of pull will heat up your cables pretty much, but the 90 second "rest" will allow them to cool back down as well as giving your battery time to replace some of the amp capacity you just zapped from it! Running your fuse box from the input side of your contactor is fine but your contactor is probably in the same vicinity as your OEM terminal block which would make for a neater install. BTW, I personally do not fuse my winch cables.

Now I'm confused. I have 3500lbs winch. According to this data I need over a 250amp CB. Right? I only have an 80. Am I missing something?
Yeah, the 80 amp CB comes AFTER your winch power cables (see above) so what the 80 amp CB is protecting is your relay and your fuse box and their associated cables/wires - has nothing to do with your winch.
 

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Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)
Sorry Jake, I don't have a 900 so I'm not sure how long the cables have to be (Anyone out there know?) but it seems like 12.5' should be enough. Although you can use 4 ga from the OEM terminals to the fuse box, you are libel to have a tough time finding a 4 ga to a #10 (size of the stud on the fuse box) ring connector--smaller cable (~6ga) there would be fine. Remember to NOT put a CB between the battery and the OEM terminal block unless you don't plan to ever install a winch.
 

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Sorry Jake, I don't have a 900 so I'm not sure how long the cables have to be (Anyone out there know?) but it seems like 12.5' should be enough. Although you can use 4 ga from the OEM terminals to the fuse box, you are libel to have a tough time finding a 4 ga to a #10 (size of the stud on the fuse box) ring connector--smaller cable (~6ga) there would be fine. Remember to NOT put a CB between the battery and the OEM terminal block unless you don't plan to ever install a winch.
could you explane more about not adding the cb? I have a 75 watt ham radio wired to the stock buss bar.i also have a winch that come new with them.
jim
 

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I bought these in Amazon: do a search for: 4 AWG Tinned Seamless Marine Lugs, #10 Post, 5 Pack They were $6.95
 

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could you explane more about not adding the cb? I have a 75 watt ham radio wired to the stock buss bar.i also have a winch that come new with them.
jim
CB = circuit breaker, not in reference to a CB radio. You don't want to put a circuit breaker between the battery terminal and buss bar if you are going to wire a winch to the buss bar. The winch would trip the breaker if wire it to the buss bar. If you wire the winch straight to the battery, you will be fine.

Jeff


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Tip:
When the directions say to "Disconnect the battery before performing any electrical work" it is wise to do that. DAMHIKT. :chargrined:
 
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