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Discussion Starter #1
I know that I had a write-up on here somewhere, but I can't find it to save my life. So after a couple of requests from other members, I dug up the only two pic's from Photobucket that I could find, and here's a quick rundown on how to add them.

Although mine weren't completely shot yet, I decided to start with new bushings and bolt collars when I did this. It's not 100% necessary, but if yours are worn, this is definitely the time to replace them. Same for wheel bearings......if you need them or there's any doubt, now would be the time.

First, find the zerks that you plan to use. You "can" use the hammer in type (which do not require a tap and threading), but I'm not a fan of those. I've seen them pull out, especially when you have a new grease gun and the head is particularly tight.

I used 1/4"-28 threaded zerks, which will also require you to buy a tap and appropriate size drill bit if you don't already have those.

It is imperative that you use the SHORTEST FITTING POSSIBLE. I can't remember the exact length, but they were around 1/8" long and I got mine at NAPA. If you use one any longer, it will contact the bolt collar and will not accept grease when you put it all together :shock: , so pay attention when you put it together and make sure you have a little (doesn't take much) clearance between those items.

Using a 45 or 90 degree fitting "can" make things easier, but it can also cause issues. Sometimes they can end up getting oriented in the wrong direction to get them completely tight. The only solution (that I know of) would then be to back it out, add some red (high strength) Loktite, and reinstall them in the correct orientation, stopping short of completely tight and relying on the Loktite to hold them in position. Using a straight zerk (which is what I did on the arms) will eliminate the potential orientation issue, but it makes placement more critical.

Once you've got your zerks and tap / drill bit, start by removing the arms and cleaning all of the bushing sockets. If you'll be re-using the bushing and collars, clean those thoroughly as well.

Find the center of the A-arm collar and drill the hole as close as possible to the edge of the weld (see pic' below), but not so close that the hex head of the zerk will hit that weld and not allow you to tighten it down completely. If you drill it too far away from the weld, you will not be able to get a grease gun on the fitting.........or you might have to jack up the Ranger in order to put enough angle on the arm in order to access the fitting. After drilling, tap it and install the zerk. Because of the close proximity, I recommend doing one arm (or just one zerk) and test fitting it on the frame before drilling all holes for the other zerks. The zerk you see on the upper arm was the first one that I installed and is EXTREMELY close to requiring a 90 degree head. I just barely can get a grease gun on it. I learned from that mistake and installed the rest further away from the frame and closer to the weld on the arm, as you can see on the lower zerk.


Now onto the collars. Find the center of the bolt collar and drill a pair of holes (one hole on each side of the collar, 180* from each other) to allow grease to flow to the bolt. Hole size isn't critical, but I wouldn't make the hole smaller than 1/8" nor larger than 3/16". I used 1/8" holes and it works fine. Sand the burrs created from drilling those holes. The outside is simple and you can use anything (file, sandpaper, etc....) but the inside will require a dremel or running the appropriate size drill bit through it. The holes need to be in the center of the collar or the bushings will block grease flow.

Once the above is done on all pivot points, make sure all metal shavings are removed from the inside of the bolt collar and bushing collar, then install the bushings and collars, and put the arms on the frame.

I also installed zerks on the rear carrier, since I seemed to get more bushing wear there than on the arm bushings. My carriers had actually worn to the point that new bushing no longer helped (the hole in the carrier was elongated) and I had to replace both rear carriers to remove the slop. As an example, see the pic' below. The hole on the left is the lower carrier bushing, and you can see the bushing condition below the carrier.


This is an area that I DO recommend using a 90 degree zerk (see pic' below). Otherwise, the only way you'll be able to grease them will require removing the hub/rotor. You'll still have to remove the wheel to access this zerk.


After you have the above complete, re-assemble everything, grease it thoroughly, put the wheels back on, and enjoy squeak-free riding and longer bushing life. 8)
 

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Jerry what's your thoughts on drilling 1/8in half way into the bolt then 1 cross, and double cross drill the sleeve. This would make it much easier to grease but I have not disassembled yet and wondering if you think there is enough clearance between the bolt and sleeve if the holes don't line up(reason for the double drill) and if it would weaken the bolt to much, would/could replace with grade 8. It may be hard to take grease but my gun can build up to 7500psi.

Where is it suppose to pivot?
 

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Good writeup Jerry!
 

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pede58 said:
Jerry what's your thoughts on drilling 1/8in half way into the bolt then 1 cross, and double cross drill the sleeve. This would make it much easier to grease but I have not disassembled yet and wondering if you think there is enough clearance between the bolt and sleeve if the holes don't line up(reason for the double drill) and if it would weaken the bolt to much, would/could replace with grade 8. It may be hard to take grease but my gun can build up to 7500psi.

Where is it suppose to pivot?
There is nothing wrong with that at all Larry. I started this concept in 2005 with the method like Jerry is using but always wanted to do it like you mention. But you need extended bits and a metal lathe to do it correctly. Drilling a 3/32" hole in the center of the bolt will not decrease the strength enough (if at all). Drag racers have their axles center drilled to increase torrsional strength.

BTW- nice write up Jerry.
 

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Thanks Neal.

I've done this before on a drill press with different stuff through the years and had good success. The more I though about weakening the bolts, most are case hardened and for the most part would be drilling through the soft material anyways, most times I like to replace with grade 8 but in some cases if it needs a little flex will stick with 5. Now the real question is where is it suppose to pivot? I'm going to guess the rubber pivots on the sleeve since this would were out cheaper parts, but that depends on an ethical engineer, I can make the grease come out anywhere.
 

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Not trying to get off topic, just finished my fronts and only drilled one hole in the pivot tubes not a second hole at 180 just saw this, just got the back torn down my hubs are stuck in the bearing carries on both sides and one pivot tub is froze in the carrier the one that has the tight fit in the middle. Going to try try to punch out the pivot tub today and the hubs out of the bearing carrier pretty sure the hubs are trashed any one no the correct size of the hubs shaft were it rides inside the bearing ,any suggestion or should I take them someone that has a press. Also should just the pivot tubes on the bearing carries have to grease holes at 180 apart. thanks for the help Greg
 

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Called and odred all my parts for the back of the ranger, pivot tubs bolts bushing bearings ect. Was going to order the 90 zerks that Polaris uses thought they may be shorter threads 8 cost $36.94 not:peach: Napa 5 for 3.68
 

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Couple Questions:

1. I watched several videos on Youtube(must be true, right?) on installing grease fittings on cars and trucks. They don't disassemble the ball part - they grease the tap, wipe it down and install fitting. Is taking the joints completely apart necessary? Looks like a lot of work.

2. I didn't notice if you installed fittings on the ball joints. If not, why?
 

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Jerry do you recall how many miles were on your Ranger when you pulled the bearing carriers & saw the worn out holes? Did you keep the worn parts? A machine shop should be able to bore the worn hole & sleeve it.
 

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I used 1/4"-28 threaded zerks, which will also require you to buy a tap and appropriate size drill bit if you don't already have those.

It is imperative that you use the SHORTEST FITTING POSSIBLE. I can't remember the exact length, but they were around 1/8" long and I got mine at NAPA. If you use one any longer, it will contact the bolt collar and will not accept grease when you put it all together :shock: , so pay attention when you put it together and make sure you have a little (doesn't take much) clearance between those items.

Using a 45 or 90 degree fitting "can" make things easier, but it can also cause issues. Sometimes they can end up getting oriented in the wrong direction to get them completely tight. The only solution (that I know of) would then be to back it out, add some red (high strength) Loktite, and reinstall them in the correct orientation, stopping short of completely tight and relying on the Loktite to hold them in position. Using a straight zerk (which is what I did on the arms) will eliminate the potential orientation issue, but it makes placement more critical.

Once you've got your zerks and tap / drill bit, start by removing the arms and cleaning all of the bushing sockets. If you'll be re-using the bushing and collars, clean those thoroughly as well.

Find the center of the A-arm collar and drill the hole as close as possible to the edge of the weld (see pic' below), but not so close that the hex head of the zerk will hit that weld and not allow you to tighten it down completely. If you drill it too far away from the weld, you will not be able to get a grease gun on the fitting.........or you might have to jack up the Ranger in order to put enough angle on the arm in order to access the fitting. After drilling, tap it and install the zerk. Because of the close proximity, I recommend doing one arm (or just one zerk) and test fitting it on the frame before drilling all holes for the other zerks. The zerk you see on the upper arm was the first one that I installed and is EXTREMELY close to requiring a 90 degree head. I just barely can get a grease gun on it. I learned from that mistake and installed the rest further away from the frame and closer to the weld on the arm, as you can see on the lower zerk.


Now onto the collars. Find the center of the bolt collar and drill a pair of holes (one hole on each side of the collar, 180* from each other) to allow grease to flow to the bolt. Hole size isn't critical, but I wouldn't make the hole smaller than 1/8" nor larger than 3/16". I used 1/8" holes and it works fine. Sand the burrs created from drilling those holes. The outside is simple and you can use anything (file, sandpaper, etc....) but the inside will require a dremel or running the appropriate size drill bit through it. The holes need to be in the center of the collar or the bushings will block grease flow.

Once the above is done on all pivot points, make sure all metal shavings are removed from the inside of the bolt collar and bushing collar, then install the bushings and collars, and put the arms on the frame.

I also installed zerks on the rear carrier, since I seemed to get more bushing wear there than on the arm bushings. My carriers had actually worn to the point that new bushing no longer helped (the hole in the carrier was elongated) and I had to replace both rear carriers to remove the slop. As an example, see the pic' below. The hole on the left is the lower carrier bushing, and you can see the bushing condition below the carrier.


This is an area that I DO recommend using a 90 degree zerk (see pic' below). Otherwise, the only way you'll be able to grease them will require removing the hub/rotor. You'll still have to remove the wheel to access this zerk.


After you have the above complete, re-assemble everything, grease it thoroughly, put the wheels back on, and enjoy squeak-free riding and longer bushing life. 8)
If you have a right angle grease coupler, would it be possible to use straight fittings? I'm leery of the 90* fitting because as you say it can be oriented in the wrong direction when you install it.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
If you have a right angle grease coupler, would it be possible to use straight fittings? I'm leery of the 90* fitting because as you say it can be oriented in the wrong direction when you install it.
I can't answer that. It might work. You could also use Loktite to keep them in the correct orientation, or you can use really thin washers as shims.
 

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Jerry, I was looking @ mine yesterday & I think the "gussets" in the casting probably preclude the use of a straight fitting. The 90* fittings probably raise the lube point enough to clear the gussets.

About the orientation, I was thinking during today's ride, that you could try more than 1 fitting during the installation part in each threaded hole. Some fittings may tighten @ a "better" spot than others.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Some of the angled fittings are made in 2 pieces and allow for adjustment. Just be sure you get that type if you decide to go with an angled fitting.
 
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