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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I see a few posts regarding electric bed lifts/lift kits, but nothing that is recent. Can anyone direct me to the correct linear actuator to install for a bed lift on a 2019 Ranger 1000? I'm not sure of the stroke length and the ones I have found online are good for 200-300 lbs. I would like one that matches the bed capacity of 1000 lbs. Thanks.
 

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‘17 Ranger 570 Midsize
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I regularly dump my midsize bed completely full of dirt above the sides that I put in with my tractor. I can’t imagine 300 lbs wouldn’t be enough unless all of the weight was all in the very front of the bed. When I haul dirt, it usually goes onto my tailgate as well. Frankly, the hardest part is getting the release loose on uneven ground. I haven’t weighed the load, but it’s probably more than Ranger is supposed to hold.

Yep, I could haul the dirt with the tractor, but it’s faster to dump in the Ranger and even driving in L it is much faster than using the tractor unless the dirt pile is very close to where it is going which doesn’t happen very much.
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I regularly dump my midsize bed completely full of dirt above the sides that I put in with my tractor. I can’t imagine 300 lbs wouldn’t be enough unless all of the weight was all in the very front of the bed. When I haul dirt, it usually goes onto my tailgate as well. Frankly, the hardest part is getting the release loose on uneven ground. I haven’t weighed the load, but it’s probably more than Ranger is supposed to hold.

Yep, I could haul the dirt with the tractor, but it’s faster to dump in the Ranger and even driving in L it is much faster than using the tractor unless the dirt pile is very close to where it is going which doesn’t happen very much.
All good points. However, part of the reason for the electric lift is the fact that my wife will use it as well. Dumping it doesn't appear to be that hard for her. Pushing the bed back down again against the pressure of the shock/lift seems to be more burdensome. Thanks for your thoughts.
 

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2011 Ranger 800 6xCentipede
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Just received one from the big name online auction site that's going to be fab'd onto my 2011. It claims 6000N (1320 #'s) capacity, 300mm (12") stroke and a"waterproof" IC 54 rating, there are a ton of them listed, mostly from China... Am fixing to mount it inverted to keep water out better, it looks about the same as the ones claiming IC44 and may help it last longer. Not sure what your rig looks like underneath, but I measured the open and closed bed to see what dimensions may fit. Mossman381 has a YT vid showing a retro he did on his earlier rig:
. Mine has an earlier model bed and latches from either style won't work, so for less than $70.00; I'm going to try it and see if it'll also hold the bed down. Gets old tossing ballast in and out the front of the bed when carrying a loaded spray tank on the rear.
 

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Looking at doing this on a 2021 Northstar for my dad who is getting older. Found this actuator and switch. Actuator is 20amp max draw at full load and switch is 20amp capacity at 12volt and per manufacturer would handle it fine without a relay.


Want to wire it in with a pulse bar adapter but not sure if I should use the hot wire or keyed wire off of the pulse plug. The switch has a light on it so I don't want to drain the battery but not sure if the keyed wire will handle the amperage.
 

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2015 Polaris ranger 570 XP
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One thing you have to consider when trying to fit a linear actuator or hydraulic cylinder is the geometry. The actuator/cylinder one uses isn't pushing perpendicular to the load in most cases. Usually it's pushing at some angle not directly in line with the load. In such cases the actuator/cylinder is at a mechanical disadvantage and therefore needs to capable of lifting more than the actual load required. The other thing that is necessary to consider is whether your attachment points are capable of withstanding the load that will be placed upon them by the actuator/cylinder. The the mounting ares are not strong enough the mounts will either break or something will be bent.

My point is that there is some figuring that is required to size the actuator/cylinder. It's not as simple as I'll grab this actuator, stick it here and it'll be good. You don't need to be an engineer to figure out what will work, you just need to use some common sense.
 
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Thanks for heads up, forgot about the mechanical disadvantage, the one version has 2000lb capacity, so double the bed capacity ought to cover for it. I'll have to do some close measuring to make sure it fits for sure. Worst case I fabricate or but some beefier mounts. The electrical wiring is where I really get nervous, it's far from what I normally deal with.
 

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Thanks for heads up, forgot about the mechanical disadvantage, the one version has 2000lb capacity, so double the bed capacity ought to cover for it. I'll have to do some close measuring to make sure it fits for sure. Worst case I fabricate or but some beefier mounts. The electrical wiring is where I really get nervous, it's far from what I normally deal with.
The good news is that you're dealing with DC current. There is some good information on this site beginning with the link here: Adding a Fuse Box.
This is especially useful if you have or plan to have more accessories/lights. In your circuit all you really need for this particular accessory is wire of the gauge necessary to carry the amperage, a switch, relay, fuse or breaker and a good ground. Personally I like to use marine wire because it's tinned for corrosion protection and comes sheathed with both the ground and hot wires together much like Romex for home wiring, only stranded for flexibility and vibration resistance. That is the simple version of the whole job.

There is additional good information that I suggest you read before undertaking the wiring here:
Ranger Technical
 

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Thank you. The marine wire would be really helpful and make running the damn wires along the frame a lot easier. If the switch has sufficient amperage for the device a relay shouldn't be needed though I may have misunderstood some of it while reading.
 

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2020 Ranger XP1000 Northstar Crew Ultimate
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2020 Ranger XP1000 Northstar Crew Ultimate
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Depending on the draw of whatever actuator you go with it is possible to at least use the factory wires that are ran already. Would save you a bit of time I would think.
 

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Looked at that before and agree it looks easy but it is very pricey. An actuator and switch and the wiring is about 300 less, which will then inevitably be spent on more things for it.
I have been considering doing this also. From the small amount of research I have done, I think the Polaris kit is a decent value. Can it be done cheaper, yes, for sure. But may involve a lot of time and some fabricating, I can do both, but also value my time so I consider it a cost.

1) It is factory designed so you know it will fit and function properly the first time. Buying parts on the open market, there is the chance something wont fit or has to be returned and another bought, adding time and cost. So that risk is removed with the Polaris kit. Any custom fabricating could lead to trial and error fitment and really add to the time involved.
2) The wiring is plug and play. Rangers ain't cheap, hacking into the factory harness is out of the question for me, just going to do that. But adding additional wiring on a stand alone system is fine in my opinion. The plug and play just assures everything is sized correctly and reduces/eliminates the chance of burning something up. My unit has Ride Command so I am very careful with the electronics and Polaris has made it super easy with the bus bar.
3) With the Polaris kit everything physically fits right, clears moving parts so no rubbing, works right and get mounted with the Rangers capabilities designed in, so it wont get beat to death while using the Ranger for other things. All the wiring is factory loomed, so connections are weather/water tight, and the harness is designed to get fastened and routed with long term protection designed in.

Now I enjoy a project, and I like learning new things taking on projects I've never done before, and 300 bucks is 300 bucks! This project could be fairly easy to put together with parts purchased from an online source, but I think it could go sideways pretty easy too. For me the Ranger is a tool, I am often frugal, but spending money on tools is something I will do. So for me, I think I will one day go with the Polaris kit, heck it may even get discounted because I don't think very many people buy it. If you get it worked out with locating an actuator that functions and fits good, please post some pictures, I would love to see this come together for you.
 
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