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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 2013 Ranger 800. Im changing rear axles but I cant get bolts out of the A arm and bearing carrier (hub) They spin freely but will not come out.
Any ideas would be appreciated. I have aero croil penetrating oil on them now.
 

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2015 Polaris ranger 570 XP
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If the bots are mated with a nut you might be able to use a nut splitter and sacrifice the nut to get it off the bolt. Heating with a torch can be helpful but if there are bushings, seals or bearings nearby it will ruin them. If heating is used heat to cherry red and quench with water, apply penetrant and it should come off easily.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I have a 2013 Ranger 800. Im changing rear axles but I cant get bolts out of the A arm and bearing carrier (hub) They spin freely but will not come out.
Any ideas would be appreciated. I have aero croil penetrating oil on them now.
I have a 2013 Ranger 800. Im changing rear axles but I cant get bolts out of the A arm and bearing carrier (hub) They spin freely but will not come out.
Any ideas would be appreciated. I have aero croil penetrating oil on them now.
QUOTE]
Thanks, I have the nuts off but bolts will not come out of sleeves in carrier. I'll keep trying.
 

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Your bolts are most likely seized inside the sleeves. Probably will have to torch or grind the ends off.
That's exactly what's happening. In my experience you won't get them out. You can't heat them and penetrating oil cannot get in there.

What I do is carefully cut off the head and tail of the offending bolt using an angle grinder with a cut off wheel. You can then bend the a-arm tabs and pry the carrier out. Of course, you'll have to replace the bolt and pivot.
 

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That's exactly what's happening. In my experience you won't get them out. You can't heat them and penetrating oil cannot get in there.

What I do is carefully cut off the head and tail of the offending bolt using an angle grinder with a cut off wheel. You can then bend the a-arm tabs and pry the carrier out. Of course, you'll have to replace the bolt and pivot.
Just went threw this as well, had to cut it off with the grinder like BPS said, actually worked pretty good, put never seize on the new ones when I put new stuff back together. Also threw some black paint to cover up where i got to close to the A arm tabs lol Side note, i thought maybe i could press it out with a bearing press and a socket just bigger then the bolt head, ya no dice, it just started bulging out on the tab. Had to use the press to straighten it out again, in case anyones thinking of trying that lol.
 

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2011 Ranger 800 6xCentipede
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They are a bear after they seize. I used a sawzall and cut both sides carefully through the bushing head, being careful not to damage the tab or a-arm tubes. The cordless recip saw worked best for this as my corded one's stroke was longer and tough to keep in place. This kept me from having to mangle the tabs to get the stub ends out. The air hammer wouldn't budge them, and a BFH with punch was bending the tabs out of line. Keep a good stock of blades handy; you'll notice the difference. If the bolt wore the tab's mounting holes into ovals, you can easily mig them down, and finish them out with a die grinder. I used a 3/8" rod passed through them all to make sure they were all in a relative pivot plane. After it was done; I drilled holes and welded 1/4-28 nuts on the inboard tubes and screwed grease fittings into all 24 of them on our 6x6! These were reassembled using HD silicone grease from a Hotchkiss suspension kit project and neversieze, then hit with a grease gun afterward. Be careful on reassembly to use a torque wrench. The tubes appeared to be ballooned onto the bolts from someone overtightening them in the past.
The outer carrier bolts were a whole other story. They had all seized in the tubes, and the lower tubes were also seized into the rear aluminum carrier housings... Major PIA! The cuss words on this part can't be edited or there'd be nothing left to say! Several hours on each of the four, heating, spraying and liberal application of a 20 ton press after turning a press pin on the lathe to make it "easier". After the first two; I wished it was a 4x4! They were a worthy foe, but relented in the end... I didn't think to take pics, but seems to be enough others that have the same issue. Am glad I went through it; will never have to do it again, except maybe a few simple bushing changes along the way.
 
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They are a bear after they seize. I used a sawzall and cut both sides carefully through the bushing head, being careful not to damage the tab or a-arm tubes. The cordless recip saw worked best for this as my corded one's stroke was longer and tough to keep in place. This kept me from having to mangle the tabs to get the stub ends out. The air hammer wouldn't budge them, and a BFH with punch was bending the tabs out of line. Keep a good stock of blades handy; you'll notice the difference. If the bolt wore the tab's mounting holes into ovals, you can easily mig them down, and finish them out with a die grinder. I used a 3/8" rod passed through them all to make sure they were all in a relative pivot plane. After it was done; I drilled holes and welded 1/4-28 nuts on the inboard tubes and screwed grease fittings into all 24 of them on our 6x6! These were reassembled using HD silicone grease from a Hotchkiss suspension kit project and neversieze, then hit with a grease gun afterward. Be careful on reassembly to use a torque wrench. The tubes appeared to be ballooned onto the bolts from someone overtightening them in the past.
The outer carrier bolts were a whole other story. They had all seized in the tubes, and the lower tubes were also seized into the rear aluminum carrier housings... Major PIA! The cuss words on this part can't be edited or there'd be nothing left to say! Several hours on each of the four, heating, spraying and liberal application of a 20 ton press after turning a press pin on the lathe to make it "easier". After the first two; I wished it was a 4x4! They were a worthy foe, but relented in the end... I didn't think to take pics, but seems to be enough others that have the same issue. Am glad I went through it; will never have to do it again, except maybe a few simple bushing changes along the way.
Been there....Done that... and 2 cents worth of NEVERSEZE from POCO and it would never have happened..
 

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Been there....Done that... and 2 cents worth of NEVERSEZE from POCO and it would never have happened..
I find my self saying that about a lot of mfg's when I'm cursing their eyes!
 
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