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So I have plowed many times, but this will be the first time on gravel/recycled asphalt. I am looking at replacing the wear bar with a floating one, or going with a rubber one to keep from tearing up the driveway. Any suggestions would be appreciated. I know the cutting edge I have now will tear it up, and the skids seem to dig in as well. I was leaning toward the steel floating wear bar, but the idea of something rubber that tucks under might work too.
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2015 Polaris ranger 570 XP
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I'm far from being an expert so I'll just relate what I've learned. First, although I've not ever used one, ploy wear bars are available. They are supposed to be gentler on pavement, I don't know about gravel. You might research them. I plow a steep 1.5 mile paved driveway maybe 3 or 4 times a winter using the OEM steel bar. The pavement on the drive is rough with dips, high spots and patches so I adjust the skids so that I have about 1" of clearance between the wear bar and the surface. Occasionally the wear bar still touches, but not often. In my case I find that if I leave about an inch of snow it melts off pretty quickly on sunny days in no shaded areas and that inch doesn't keep me from driving safely. The only problem is that if the snow is driven on and doesn't melt off and it gets below freezing that night ice forms and it's slippery. When that happens I run chains on my vehicle if I must go out. Since we don't really have prolonged periods of sub freezing weather here in western NC and I am retired so I can pick my days to leave home this system works for me.

I also have gravel on the apron approaching my garage. Plowing it is always a problem. Invariably the gravel gets picked up by the plow with the snow as it's pushed. I haven't found any way to prevent that so I lower my plow to the point that I leave maybe 3 or 4 inches of snow (provided it's that deep) and cut/push only the top layer of snow away leaving the lower part with the gravel untouched. Since this area is only about 30 feet wide I just deal with it the best I can and in the worst case I can always spread salt after the top layer is pushed away.

Based upon my limited experience with plowing on gravel I just don't see how snow can be plowed to the gravel surface without also removing some gravel with the snow. If you get a rubber or poly wear bar It'll be interesting to hear how it works for you.
 

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Never tried it because I didn't have to.. Have been plowing many years. But still may if the need arises.

Search pvc plow edge. Would try this before spending any money on a specialty blade.
 

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'21 Northstar premium
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Unless your gravel had some moisture in it and froze solid when the weather turned cold (best case actually), about all you can do is lift up a bit. I have a Polaris plow and can't keep the skids tight, so I just carry the plow a bit. I think I will make a different set of skids before first snow.
 

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‘17 Ranger 570 Midsize
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I've plowed a few years. I've worn holes in the skids. I don't know if that makes me an "expert" or not.

Any way, only a bit of my area that I plow is asphalt, but the skids didn't seem to hurt it.

I do recommend using synthetic winch rope or strap. Metal rope can work, but you better bring clamps and wrenches with you to repair when the wire rope breaks. :D
 

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2020 Ranger 1000 XP
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I would just lower the skid shoes so you have a gap between the edge and the gravel. A little snow will be left behind, but you won't have to rake so much in the spring.
 

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My yard is loose carvel. I back drag the first snow and drive on it to pack it down, and after that it’s like plowing on concrete. Depending on how much thawing you get during the winter, your mileage may very. (I live in Alaska)
 

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My yard is loose carvel. I back drag the first snow and drive on it to pack it down, and after that it’s like plowing on concrete. Depending on how much thawing you get during the winter, your mileage may very. (I live in Alaska)
This has been a strange winter, we didn’t get any wet weather before freeze up, so my rocks are not frozen to the ground and I occasionally break through the packed snow and scoop up some gravel. I can tell when I dig in and raise the blade a little. We have rain in the forecast, hope it will help!
 
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