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Discussion Starter #1
I have a 2014 ranger 800 6x6 with close to 1000 miles on it. It was fairly trouble free this summer and overall I'm happy with it. With that being said, I'm going to completely dissassemble it this winter and modify a few things I've never liked from the factory. I'm often alone and in the middle of nowhere, sometimes for a couple days. Having a reliable machine is paramount.

I've read about quite a few transmission problems on here. It sounds like the 2014 transmission cases were beefed up over prior years so maybe the later ones are less prone to failure. Is it worth it to pull the transmission and replace the bearings with quality ones before a failure happens? Are the transmission problems pretty much strictly related to poor quality bearings? What's the most common part to fail if not the bearing?

I need to do some additional reading but it sounds like Turf Mode can cause issues as well which I never use. Is Turf Mode removeable?

Another trouble area seems to be the front differential. SuperATV sells an aluminum sprague carrier to replace the plastic oem unit. It's only listed for 2010 Ranger 800's. Did Polaris switch to metal in the 2011+ Rangers?

I haven't read about too many engine related problems so I'm not too worried their. My factory warranty ends in November, so I'm trying to decide if I want to get the extended warranty or not. The though of a dealership mechanic touching my Ranger is not comforting to me. If I can prevent most of the common problems from happening then I'll pass on it.
 

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Hey Caleb,
Something to think about regarding the warranty: I know that you do the wrench turning on your machine, but if I'm not mistaken (and I've seen a few people mention it), you can get the parts from the dealer under warranty and you can install it yourself? Just picking up one diff would probably be worth the cost of the warranty and not having to pay for the part. If they don't like exchanging the high dollar stuff then that would be a different story. Give Frankie a call out at Big Lake and see what he says.
 

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That is the question. what came first, the chicken or the egg?

The transmission failures on our 11 and 12 rangers have been the upper LH bearing failing, then causing the LH side of the case to break out followed by massive carnage to the chain, and drive sprocket. sometimes even to the main drive shaft.

Are the bearings cheap chinese units? yes. but on none of my machines did I ever have trans problems till about 1350 hours or around 7000 miles... the dealer and I are not sure if it's the cheap bearings that fail first or the lack of splash lubrication to that bearing that causes the failure itself.

If you'll notice, the 13 and 14 model years have the trans fill plug up higher on the case than the 11/12 models for more fluid capacity. apparently polaris knew about their shortcomings and tried to make up for it with added oil.

on the last two transmissions we've done, my dealer intentionally overfilled the transmission about 16oz either by putting it in through the breather, or tipping the machine on it's side with a jack and getting the extra oil in that way.

As for the front axle, I've not had any durability issues, just corrosion in the splines because polaris was too cheap to use a rubber lip seal to seal out water and mud. they'll go about 700 hours before the front axles get sloppy. they'll go another 500 or so before the cv hubs start slapping the lower control arm mount and rip a hole in the cv boot. those were the major things.

Also wouldn't hurt every few hundred hours to remove the steering rack boots and re-grease the rack. I had a pinhole in my boot and it filled my rack with water over the winter from the snow packing in around the front and then melting off in my garage overnight.... Doesn't hurt to hit the U-joint from the steering shaft while you're there. they tend to rust and sieze up in time, or you'll notice a stiff spot in the steering. penetrating oil or PJ-1 chain lube (blue can) works great.
 

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The sprague carrier on my 12 was cast aluminum. Not sure when they switched. I am having it replaced with a billet one, just because, while my new billet front diff is being built.
 

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Both my transmission issues were related to teeth breaking off an upper gear. Neither caused massive failure, but both required the mechanic to go into the case for repairs. I went through 3 or 4 front diffs in 3 years. Failure was always at the same place the input shaft bushing. If I was going to replace / repair something in the front diff, that would be it. Your wear schedule will probably be accelerated from POS Polaris due to the fact (I'm guessing from his posts) that his machines are used for more day to day work versus, rough and tumble back country riding. Using these machines in extreme environments drastically speeds up the wear rate.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the information from everyone. Definitely have some maintenance to do this winter.
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
I was looking in the service manual today and found it interesting that the transmission fluid capacity on the 4x4 and crew is only 33.8 ounces, but it's 43.6 ounces on the 6x6. Strange since the 6x6 transmission is a single unit and not part of the rear diff. You'd the think the 4x4's would have more fluid capacity.
 

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I get the transmissions as full as I can get them. Whatever pukes out of the vent tube is fine. Usually I can get 3 quarts in them by tipping the machine one way or another. although I always pushes some out after some high speed riding.

Is the transmission on your 6x6 completely divorced like the old 700s were?

Never seen a front diff failure myself, but we really don't spend much time in AWD.

Prop shaft U joints on these things are a bit of a wear item as well (always have been). Usually they'll go 500-800 hours before they start getting loose.

Have to think about this more today, I'm just not real familiar with the 6x6
 

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That's good to know. Looks like the old style tranny out of the 700.
 

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looks just like my 2003 model Had mine apart last year to replace leaking seals mine only has 250 hrs so mostly due to seals getting hard cleaned up a couple teeth other wise great shape. The Video on the site for the rebuild is awesome ck it out before you start not a bad job at all
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Opened the middle diff up and everything looked good. Replacing the lower seals since it's apart.


Both ends of the through shaft have some seal wear that needs to be polished out.


Next was the transmission. It also looked good inside but has a couple things to note.
The guts of it actually looked really good.


There was a bunch of extra sealant everywhere inside courtesy of Polaris.


One of the shift forks has some minor wear that will get polished out.


The pinion bearing was fairly smooth but noisy and will be getting replaced. All the other bearings were good.


The output shaft gets pushed into the case under load and wears against it. It was worn in to the case .008 so I'm going to add a .010 steel shim between the case and gear.



Yay for engineers.
 

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Good move on replacing the pinion bearing. It receives more wear than any other part of the tranny, other than possibly the main chain. I would replace it too while I had it apart.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I ended up dropping a shim down inside the case in the trans to stop the wear.


I noticed the end of my front pinion shaft was kind of rough. Thinking a small bearing was inside I pulled the end out and realized it's just a solid pin. It was particles from the input shaft bushing causing it to feel rough. Cleaned everything well and it spins good as new.
 

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Not sure if that spot you're talking about shimming is in the trans or the front diff? I'd be cautious when shimming up a shaft like that. if it's the selector shaft, or the other one with the reverse chain on it, shimming it up will put an angle on your reverse chain if the other one isn't the shimmed up the same amount.

What concerns me even more though is that by shimming it up you've made the shaft longer. and it may stop you from getting the case halves back together. if it were me, I think I'd leave it alone and re-bearing it.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I shimmed the transmission. Do to how much it was worn and the play, it will be fine. The shim is only there to keep it from wearing further into the case. I'll take a few more pics tonight to explain it better.
 

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Looks like the OP has got things under control so I want to ask a question from everybody. I was reading the first post and it hit me. The 2010's thru 2013 had a different trans with a main drive chain. Now that they've went back to a trans without a main drive chain, just a rear chain. Aren't a lot of the problems mentioned gone now?
 

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Discussion Starter #18
The shaft that was shimmed still has lots of play in it, so it's definitely not in a bind, or binding the case. It's the shaft on the right which is the output shaft.




The gear just walks on the splines so the alignment is not changed. In this picture, the gear is in its natural position and as you can see, is still free to move on the splines.




I hope that's a little more clear.
 

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IC,

Looks like the 900's trans is a bit different than the older ones.... most likely uses alot of the same parts, but still different
 
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