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Discussion Starter #1
Since the time I've been a Forum member there have been numerous posts by Ranger owners complaining if difficulty in purging the cooling system. There have been suggestions of jacking up the front end, explanations of how to use the purge port that Polaris includes for that purpose and a few who have had repeated overheating events.

This post is to let people know about a tool I purchased and recently in hope of avoiding air pockets in the cooling system. I used it on a Nissan Xterra which sometimes also has a purge problem. This tool has been around for some time and is used by mechanics in the automotive world often. My purchase of the tool was with the intent on using it on my Ranger when coolant change time comes around or after I install my Firestorm heater but the Xterra job came up first. Whether it will work as well on the Ranger as it did on the Xterra remains to be seen, but if it does it will eliminate the problem of air pockets in the cooling system. The refill of the Xterra cooling system went flawlessly and with zero spills or mess and there was the side benefit of a complete vacuum test of the cooling system before putting in coolant so any leaks found could be repaired before adding coolant.

The downside is that you will need an air compressor capable of producing about 90 PSI. It can be as small as 1 HP as long as you have a large enough reservoir tank to provide airflow for about 30 seconds. Not long ago after moving I purchased a new 5HP air compressor with 60 gallon tank but I'm certain my old 2 HP 20 gallon compressor would have done the job as well. My new compressor didn't even cycle during the evacuation of the cooling system. The way the tool works even a small compressor will work becasue you can partially evacuate the system, turn off a valve, wait for the compressor to rebuild pressure and start the purge again right where you left off.

There are numerous similar tools out there but this is the one I purchased:
https://www.amazon.com/OEMTOOLS-24444-Cooling-System-Refiller/dp/B01BW39HJS/ref=sr_1_1?crid=15LD4URYIWQ4G&keywords=cooling+system+vacuum+purge+and+refill+ki t&qid=1554296976&s=automotive&sprefix=cooling+system%2Cautomotive%2C190&sr=1-1

How to:

Note: I haven't used this on my Ranger yet. I am not affiliated with the manufacturer of this tool. The video is not me but simply a depiction of how to use a tool very to the one I own.
 

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Didn't know they made such a thing. Could've used one last year. Put a radiator and a new thermostat in a cab tractor.It took 3 months to get the air out of it. I've got kind of a tool fetish anyway.

Sent from my SM-T230NU using Tapatalk
 

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Considering the cost of going to a dealer to have service work done I can enjoy buying the needed tools and still have lot of $$$$ left over. My Xterra would have cost over $1600 to do the 90k service on the transfer cases, transmission, spark plug and radiator replacement. When I did the job with having to buy 1 tool and fluids was under $300. All synthetic oils, Bosch plus 4 plugs got the mileage to 19+ too.
 

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Thanks for posting, lets us know how it works on your 570. It certainly looks like it will.
 

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Thanks for posting, lets us know how it works on your 570. It certainly looks like it will.
It's been a while and I actually forgot about this post. I did use this tool when I installed my cab heater and engine block heater. It worked great! No overheating and I didn't even have to add coolant to the reservoir after running for a while. I also used it on my our Nissan Xterra and it worked great on that too.
 

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when it comes to air in the cooling system is an overheat that occurs after the vehicle has had a bunch of work done that involved opening up the cooling system. Some common symptoms include:
  • You or a garage just finished replacing a head gasket, water pump, intake gasket, radiator, heater core, or coolant hose, and now that the work is done, you have an overheat condition.
  • You have a condition where the vehicle starts to overheat, then suddenly drops to normal.
  • You have issues getting consistent heat from the vents.
  • Your idle fluctuates up and down and will not level out.
These are all classic symptoms of air in the cooling system. What happens is an air pocket gets trapped somewhere in the system, and does not allow the coolant to flow properly.
 
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