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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
About how long would it take to remove one engine, move parts over like stator, flywheel, intake, etc. to the replacement engine and install it completely? Will be using my shop and tools. Have a guy that may do it as I cannot do that kind of work any more. I want a fair price for both of us. Thinking of a $ amount for the completed job. Cash payment so no paper trail. Appreciate your input, thanks much.
 

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"What Ranger/engine? "

It could be a genuine RANGER BIKE in which case it would take no time at all to install the chain..;)


Geoman Ranger 20T

Bicycle Wheel Bicycles--Equipment and supplies Tire Bicycle wheel
 

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For me that's a 3-6 hour job. The wide range is due to the Ranger's age. On an 18 year old machine I tend to find stripped/broken bolts, corroded fasteners, broken engine mount isolators, missing hardware, etc, etc, etc.

As far as pricing, that's between you and the person wrenching. $100/hour in my shop with $120 coming soon.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks BPS. For a person with mechanical ability that hasn't worked on on a Ranger SxS before before I was thinking around $400. Pretty straight forward basic job, but not one that I can handle.

Thanks again.
 

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The 500s are pretty simple. The only special tools needed are a clutch puller and a three bolt flywheel puller. A first timer shouldn't have any trouble getting it done in a weekend.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I have the clutch removal bolts and several different pullers. Replaced the drive clutch about a year ago. Not sure if the flywheel has to come off before the engine comes out ? Service manual has several errors on the removal process I have found out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
OEM engine came out with no problem. Moved parts from it to the replacement and it is in complete. Won't start now. Getting fuel as the new plug was damp. Stator plate was aligned just like it came off the old engine but that don't mean the timing is right. Flywheel was marked with white at 30° as was the mark on the block. Tried checking the timing through the inspection hole in the flywheel cover. Guess I don't know what I am doing as there is no way I could see any white marks of any king in that small a hole. Guess I will be pulling flywheel cover so I can see what is going on in there.

Would turning the engine over trying to start it be enough to prime the oil pump?? My guess is NO.
 

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Would turning the engine over trying to start it be enough to prime the oil pump?? My guess is NO.
The oil pump is primed by pinching the oil tank vent line between the tank and the split in the hose. Once the line is pinched off (locking needle nose vice grips work great) engine is started and idles for a minute or two. Turn the engine off and unscrew the oil tank cap. You should hear a hissing sound. If no sound repeat the procedure, if it hisses you're good.

Stator plate was aligned just like it came off the old engine but that don't mean the timing is right
Timing would be very close if not right on by doing it that way. That's not the no start cause.

You didn't mention if there was spark at the plug?
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
Yes there is good spark at the plug lying on the top engine mount. A new NGK plug should not fail under pressure. Air filter is good also, meaning sunlight come through with no problem and was replaced not long before the old engine died.

I figured originally the timing would be good doing it the way I did, but then started having my doubts. Used a fine point white out pen to mark the timing marks. Wish I could see it through that hole in the cover.

Starter and drive were both replaced as the other were unknown as to age/wear. Ignition switch was replaced last fall.

Thought of a couple things eating supper. #1 did not do a compression test. The company I bought from warranted the engine for 1 year. Also showed the odometer reading of 555 miles on the engine. I trusted them and their reputation.
#2 I did not personally put the stator and flywheel on. The guy I hired to do the grunt work did that. He said he has had experience in small engines and said he just overhauled a Harley engine. But had not used a clicker torque wrench before. ?

Just wanting to cover all the bases.
 

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85 PSI compression is very low, maybe not even able to run that low.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Specs states 70 -90 psi for both engines. I would say that 85 PSI is near the top end of the compression scale but I am not a Polaris mechanic.

MODEL: . . . . . . . . . . RANGER 4X4
MODEL NUMBER: . A04RD50AA
ENGINE MODEL: . . EH50PLE164
Engine
Platform Fuji 4 stroke, Single Cylinder
Engine Model Number EH50PLE164
Engine Displacement 499cc
Number of Cylinders 1
Bore & Stroke (mm) 92 x 75 mm
Compression Ratio 10.2:1
Compression Pressure 70--90 psi
Engine Idle Speed 1200 􀁲 200 RPM
 

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Remember that is with a compression release.
I wondered whether that model had a compression release or not. Truthfully, I think a cylinder leak down test is far more accurate than a compression test and provides more information. The compression release has no effect on such a test and it can tell you percentage of leakage (20% or less is OK), whether valves are leaking and whether it is intake or exhaust or both when leakage is present. Sometimes CLD tests will also pinpoint head gasket failures. If the compression release has failed and is for some reason preventing the valves from closing it would show up with a CLD test as a leaking exhaust valve.

In any case, if Polaris provides a spec for compression with a release I guess you're probably OK, however, if an exhaust valve were leaking you might get the result for a compression test that is specified for one with a compression release. So IMHO, a compression test that meets Polaris specs for one with a compression release may not be accurate.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 · (Edited)
The compression release on these engines is built into the cam. I had to replace the cam complete with the release and end cap on the old engine a couple years ago. It is in the manual on exactly how the release has to be with the cam when installing the cam shaft. I am not totally convinced, but may be and probably am wrong, that it is a timing issue. It acts just like a Briggs or Kohler engine when the flywheel key is partially or fully sheared off. Going to pull the side cover off and check with a impact to turn the engine over rather than the starter. Can use the strobe light to see just when it is firing.

This engine was in a sportsman with 555 miles on it. I purchased the engine from a reputable engine re builder in Mn. They gave a one year warranty for everything except improper oil pump priming or cooling system failure. Not many will give a warranty on a used engine. With 555 miles at 25 mph is only about 23 hours. Not really broke in yet, but will check out all suggestions & possibilities. Thanks for your input and time. Will keep you posted.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 · (Edited)
Pulled the cover and checked the position of the stator. Is in the same place I had it marked on the old engine. Polaris has a crazy way of checking the timing on these. Engine has to be running at 5K and then watch for the mark in the inspection hole and if it shows up timing is good. 5K rpm means 1250 flashes/min or about 20 flashes per second. In other words just a bit short of a solid light !! Have spark, have fuel, plug is wet after turning the engine over so is getting fuel. No attempt to fire. Carb is at a Polaris shop for rebuild. Will see what happens when I get it back. This thing is starting to get to me. I have brought a lot of dead engines back to life on Garden Tractors but this one is not making any sense at all.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I have got to be missing something. The old engine suddenly died slowing up approaching my drive. I would turn over but would not start. It was tired and low on power. Hour meter that was not working when I bought it showed 1024 hours. It had an oil leak at the gasket at the cylinder. Thus I decided to replace it with this low mile/hour engine. Would the fact that the old engine would not start have any bearing on why this engine will not start ? ?
 
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