PRC Polaris Ranger Club banner
1 - 20 of 35 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,662 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I like ash too revrnd. Never burned any birch to my knowledge and try not to burn maple. I split all my wood by hand so I try to get stuff with straight grain. Like I said...I like red oak the best but I will burn any hardwood. Locust and Osage orange is awesome too but it is so freaking hard sparks will fly from a chainsaw when you cut it. A chain is pretty much toast after tackling that stuff.
Maple is the most common hardwood in Ontario. Ash is disappearing due to the emerald ash borer. Any particular reason for not wanting to burn maple? The oak we have is quite "wiry" isn't the greatest to deal w/ even using a wood splitter. Birch is "light" & burns quickly. OK for camp fires, but not the most economical to heat w/.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
165 Posts
Maple is the most common hardwood in Ontario. Ash is disappearing due to the emerald ash borer. Any particular reason for not wanting to burn maple? The oak we have is quite "wiry" isn't the greatest to deal w/ even using a wood splitter. Birch is "light" & burns quickly. OK for camp fires, but not the most economical to heat w/.

Yes. I am not sure of what the difference is but the maple available to us here in KY doesn't burn well in my stove. I am pretty sure most of it is Sugar Maple. The biggest thing is it is hard to split. After looking up the BTU values I may actually cut some and put it up for 2 years as it has similar BTU values as oak. Maybe if it is seasoned well it will burn great?

It is a real learning process with my new stove. It requires wood to be so dry that it is hard to get a handle on what woods it likes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,662 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
if it is seasoned well it will burn great?
Yes, sugar maple is hard maple. What we cut & split this year will be burnt during the winter of '15/'16. We've had an airtight stove & now use a wood burning furnace.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,662 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Firewood Chart A: Sorted by BTU Content
Common NameSpecies NamePounds
/Cord
MBTU
/Cord
Osage Orange (Hedge)Maclura pomifera4,84530.0
Hop Hornbeam (Ironwood)Ostrya virginiana4,25026.4
Persimmon, AmericanDiospyros virginiana4,16525.8
Hickory, ShagbarkCarya ovata4,08025.3
Dogwood, PacificCornus nuttallii3,99524.8
Holly, AmericanIlex Opaca3,99524.8
Birch, BlackBetula lenta3,91024.2
Oak, WhiteQuercus alba3,91024.2
Madrone, Pacific (Arbutus)Arbutus menziesii3,82523.7
Oak, PostQuercus stellata3,82523.7
Locust, HoneyGleditsia triacanthos3,82523.7
Hickory, BitternutCarya cordiformis3,82523.7
Beech, Blue (Ironwood)Carpinus caroliniana3,82523.7
MulberryMorus rubra3,74023.2
Locust, BlackRobinia pseudoacacia3,74023.2
Maple, SugarAcer saccharum3,74023.2
Beech, AmericanFagus grandifolia3,65522.7
Oak, Oregon (Garry)Quercus garryana3,65522.7
Oak, Bur (Mossycup)Quercus macrocarpa3,65522.7
Oak, RedQuercus rubra3,57022.1
Birch, YellowBetula alleghaniensis3,57022.1
Ash, WhiteFraxinus americana3,48521.6
Myrtle, Oregon (Pepperwood)Umbellularia californica3,48521.6
AppleMalus domestica3,48521.6
Ash, GreenFraxinus pennsylvanica3,40021.1
Maple, BlackAcer nigrum3,40021.1
Walnut, BlackJuglans *****3,23020.0
Maple, RedAcer rubrum3,23020.0
Ash, OregonFraxinus latifolia3,23020.0
Birch, White (Paper)Betula papyrifera3,23020.0
Tamarack (Larch)Larix laricina3,14519.5
Birch, GrayBetula populifolia3,14519.5
HackberryCeltis occidentalis3,14519.5
Juniper, Rocky MtnJuniperus scopulorum3,14519.5
Cherry, BlackPrunus serotina3,14519.5
Coffeetree, KentuckyGymnocladus dioicus3,06019.0
Sorrel (Sourwood)Oxydendrum arboreum3,06019.0
Elm, RedUlmus rubra3,06019.0
Eucalyptus (Red Gum)Eucalyptus camaldulensis2,97518.4
Elm, AmericanUlmus americana2,97518.4
Sycamore, AmericanPlatanus occidentalis2,89017.9
Maple, Big LeafAcer macrophyllum2,89017.9
Elm, White (Russian)Ulmus laevis2,89017.9
Ash, BlackFraxinus *****2,89017.9
Boxelder (Maple Ash)Acer negundo2,89017.9
Pine, Norway (Red)Pinus resinosa2,89017.9
Fir, DouglasPseudotsuga menzies II2,80517.4
Maple, SilverAcer saccharinum2,80517.4
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
125 Posts
Maple is good to burn. Used it last year. It leaves so much ash behind makes it less desirable to me. It will keep you plenty busy cleaning your stove or fireplace out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,996 Posts
shagbark! forgot about that! Yinz ever burn that? we got TONS of them here but none dead yet. You want a great fire, burn that stuff when its seasoned. i was getting 12+ hours outta a load of that stuff. burns up to almost no ash also.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
891 Posts
Regrettably, now that Emerald Ash Bore is in state, Ash is going to be a significant part of my burning menu for the coming future! Last years cut is already burning now and can't believe how fast it cures!

Cheers
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,996 Posts
we must be spoiled around here? none of us even worry about ash, we leave it laying? Same with most other softwood tree's. My neighbor burns pine cuz he's gotta outdoor burner. Well actually he burns everything he can get his saw on!

We do burn the maples, elms, hickorys oaks and locusts, cherry's. Have never layed my saw into osage, can never find it anywhere other than posted property. by the sounds of it, we got mostly all the great hardwoods in Western PA.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,044 Posts
In this order is my preference for the timber I have :
Shagbark hickory
White oak
Red and black oak
Pig nut hickory
wall nut
ash
hard maple
soft maple
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
165 Posts
Burning shagbark right now. It is awesome wood. Mine is a little green for my stove but it is great wood.

Also....wagz.....give that ash a try. It is a great wood overall to burn. If its on the ground cut it up and I bet you will like it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,996 Posts
Burning shagbark right now. It is awesome wood. Mine is a little green for my stove but it is great wood.

Also....wagz.....give that ash a try. It is a great wood overall to burn. If its on the ground cut it up and I bet you will like it.
Ill give it a whirl if i ever fire up my furnace this year. So far, havent needed the wood furnace yet.. this pellet stove is kicking major butt. im pretty amazed at just how well the dang thing does in all honesty. I was pretty freaking skeptical about it all...but ive since changed my thoughts on em.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
376 Posts
The osage orange around here, referred to as bo-dark (bois d'arc) is terrible for throwing sparks and if it's cured before you cut it up, it is so hard it will make your chain saw spark. It makes awesome fence post corners in damp locations, lasting for at least a couple of generations.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,983 Posts
We no longer have a wood burner in the shop, insurance made us remove it and being a heavy equipment owner/operator for over 40 years the chart posted seems pretty accurate but it all depends on the moisture content and each species is different, being completely dry is not always best. Osage orange, we call it hedge is the only one moisture has little impact on and will caution anyone who uses it, better have an outside or industrial burner and even then would not load the box with it but blend it instead, it will warp steel.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
417 Posts
Seems like we have most of the wood burning world on this thread, so I have a question for any one of you. Yesterday my wife asked me what are the dimensions of a full cord of wood? I haven't got a clue since all of my heat type burning has been either natural gas or propane. Thanks in advance.

Mike
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,662 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 · (Edited)
In Ontario a face cord is a pile of wood 16" wide x 4' high x 8' long. 3 face cords make a full/bush cord (4' wide x 4' high x 8' long).
 
  • Like
Reactions: mustangwagz

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,662 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
We no longer have a wood burner in the shop, insurance made us remove it and being a heavy equipment owner/operator for over 40 years the chart posted seems pretty accurate but it all depends on the moisture content and each species is different, being completely dry is not always best. Osage orange, we call it hedge is the only one moisture has little impact on and will caution anyone who uses it, better have an outside or industrial burner and even then would not load the box with it but blend it instead, it will warp steel.
I've heard the same about tamarack/larch that it burns very hot. You only burn 1 "stick" w/ another type of wood.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,996 Posts
yup, 4x4x8 here.

If yinz were to buy a cord, what does it cost around your places? it varries from 200-250 depending on whether its seasoned and what type of wood here.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,983 Posts
"tamarack/larch"

Unless it has another name, not native to my area. Might not be an accurate measurement but around here a cord is figured as a flush loaded P/U and can range from $50-150.
 
1 - 20 of 35 Posts
Top