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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 2016 Ranger 570 with 4400 miles on it. It started shuting off quite a bit now it won't start. Got a fuel pressure guage. It showed no pressure at all but I hear the pump motor run for a couple of seconds. Bought whole pump assembly from Amazon for $82. It does the same thing. No fuel is being pumped. I believe the fuse and the relay are good.
 

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"Bought whole pump assembly from Amazon for $82. "

wfi, what did you get for $82.00 ?
 

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"Bought whole pump assembly from Amazon for $82. "

wfi, what did you get for $82.00 ?
They have them as low as $54!
It showed no pressure at all but I hear the pump motor run for a couple of seconds. Bought whole pump assembly from Amazon for $82. It does the same thing. No fuel is being pumped.
If you can hear both pumps run for the first few seconds and no fuel is coming out of either of them it's either a big coincidence or your tank is empty.
 

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I have been receiving complaints about the low buck fuel assemblies on EBAY and Amazon. I would stick to known good ones like ALL BALLS and HF FUEL (Quantum).. Even QUANTUM is known for using the wrong fuel pressure regulator in a assembly . And while I am on a rant, problems with Harvey clutches on EBAY...
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The pump assembly I got got from Amazon looks exactly like the original. I pumped 2 cups of gas from the bottom of my tank to see if it was dirty. Looked at it in sunlight and it looked clean. I swaped out the fuel pump fuse and relay.
 

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The pump assembly I got got from Amazon looks exactly like the original. I pumped 2 cups of gas from the bottom of my tank to see if it was dirty. Looked at it in sunlight and it looked clean. I swaped out the fuel pump fuse and relay.
Then obviously witzfi, you got a bad one...
 

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If I try the fuel pump assembly in a bucket of water should it pump or does it need to be a close system?
If you can get power to it........it will pump water.........if the pump is any good..
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I ran 12 volts directly to new fuel pump in the gas tank. It runs but won't pump gas. I put it in a bucket of water and it pumped water. What could cause a problem like that?
 

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Evil Spirits .........o_O
 

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I don't know if this will help you diagnose the problem or not but here goes:

There is a difference between a pump's ability to pump volume and to pump pressure. The fuel pump needs to be able to do both simultaneously. Simply saying that a given fuel pump will pump a volume of a liquid doesn't necessarily mean that it can also provide the necessary pressure.

As an example, lets say we have a water pump, maybe your typical irrigation pump, that is specified to produce 30 GPM at 30 PSI. Now let's assume a problem with the pump's impeller whereby it slips on the pump shaft due to a sheared keyway, loose taper, stripped thread or other mechanism designed to hold the impeller firmly in place, and it is noticed that pressure and volume are greatly decreased at a nozzle attached to a hose served by the pump. In testing we find that the pump will not achieve it's specified pressure but when we remove the nozzle it flows water like crazy. Since we have no gauge to measure volume being produced and it looks like a lot of water is flowing we assume there is nothing wrong with the pump but we still have the problem of a weak stream & low pressure. So, we are fooled into thinking that something weird is going on and that the pump must not be the problem when in fact the impeller is slipping on the pump shaft and ultimately spinning at a lower RPM under the load of higher pressure with the nozzle installed.

In order to eliminate the pump as the problem we must not only test pressure but also volume at test pressure. How to accomplish this is the issue and most of us have neither the tools to test both nor the specifications for both GPM at a given pressure. Direct reading flow meters (prone to not being reliable), pitot tube & gauge or other methods to determining flow at a given pressure are generally impractical, unavailable or expensive. So we replace the pump that does not meet pressure specs and hope for the best.

Unfortunately, these days it's very likely to get replacement parts that are not up to OEM standards or are defective from the manufacturer, particularly if the manufacturer isn't well known and respected due to a good track record.

Given what I've stated above lets acknowledge a couple of things. First, your typical irrigation pump is a centrifugal pump which has different characteristics than the typical fuel pump, which is usually positive displacement in design; meaning that when the pump is good, for every rotation (or mechanical movement) of the pump a given volume of liquid is discharged at a given pressure. Even so, the example provided is valid. Positive displacement pumps usually use a pressure regulator to control and assure correct pressure and regulators can be a source of problems. Other sources of trouble can be restrictions on the intake side of the pump which will limit flow and pressure (filters, socks, collapsed hoses, obstructed tank vents), restrictions on the output side of the pump which have the same effect (filters, plugged or internally swollen hoses), damaged internal pump parts (rotor, vanes, piston or diaphragm) depending upon the type of pump, internal pump leaks due to improper clearances (wear, manufacturing tolerances, seals), external pump leaks (bad seals at shafts, cracks in housings), or decreased pump cycling (RPM), which in the case of an electric pump powered by DC current may be due to wiring deficiencies not supplying proper current, bad grounds (DC motors will vary speed based upon available current & voltage), internal pump friction (bad bearings or trash in the pump) or a failing motor (shorted windings or weak magnets on PM motors)

As you can see you need to investigate a lot of things before assuming the pump is the problem. Given that you have a new pump and assuming it is a good one I think I would be checking for wiring deficiencies and bad grounds. If you can, find the specs for current flow of the pump and check available current with the pump installed and running. Internally broken or corroded wiring, bad relays or poor grounds will all reduce current available to the pump.

Assuming that there is a fuel pressure regulator in the system, and depending upon how it functions (does it shut off current flow momentarily at peak pressure, vary current flow or does it bypass fuel back to the tank) it may be the cause of the issue.

The above is a general statement not specific to your Ranger. Jungleman and others can provide more specific information on pressure regulator equipment and type.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
This is the second time I've had a problem with the engine shutting off. Both times I pulled the fuel pump and ended putting it back in. It's now running fine again but now the check engine light is staying on.
 

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"but now the check engine light is staying on. "

Sooooooo wfit, what is the stored EFI code ?
 

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Code............All Wheel Drive Control Driver Circuit Short

Wifi, check the fuses and then see if the 'turf mode driver" in the back with the harness going to the turf mode solenoid is damaged OR if the driver box is very hot. Like BPS said, it probably has nothing to do with your fuel pump fiasco.

I would clear the code by removing the negative cable from the post for 1 minute and see if it comes back.
 
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