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Discussion Starter #1
when hauling heavy loads like firewood, does hauling a lot of weight in the bed put any more wear on the ranger versus hauling it in a trailer behind the ranger? I would think the extra weight in the bed might be harder on the wheel bearings and suspension? so what does the collective wisdom here say? hauling firewood in the bed vs a trailer? is hauling in the bed going to put any more wear on parts versus pulling a trailer full of wood? how about the handling? sometimes a trailer is not practical and couldn't help but wonder if hauling in the bed would cause more wear some where?

thanks!! Chris
 

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If the tongue weight is lighter than the load in the bed technically the trailer will yield less wear on the machine...

...keep in mind though that the terrain will most likely dictate which method will produce more wear, for example, if your route has a lot of rocks/roots/etc that the trailer can get hung up on it could put A LOT more stress on the belt and axles versus just putting the load in your bed...

Another variable is the type of trailer, ie single axle versus double axle....also what type of suspension on the trailer will affect the stress on the machine...

My best success hauling heavy loads is by going nice and slow with a double walking beam axle trailer...
 

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Where I cut wood hauling a trailer with the ranger is a recipe for disaster. It is very steep terrain and if you load a trailer down with firewood you may lose control descending hills. While the ranger is sure footed and pretty heavy the thought of being pushed down a steep hill by a trailer is not one I am find of. As always though YMMV.
 

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Depending on the area of the woodlot I use either method.

http://www.prcforum.com/forum/52-ranger-projects-write-ups-photos/55807-ranger-trailer.html

Some of the skidways on our woodlot are too uneven to try to haul w/ the trailer so I just load the wood in the box. The trailer is about 3' wide and a touch over 5' long. The sides are 12" tall. I don't load past the top of the sides.

We have a main trail thru the property that is widen enough to drive a pickup thru. Heck my parents have driven their Montana van about half the length of it.
 

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revrnd
Nice Trailer!
 
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Alternative suggestion: Install a pellet stove or fireplace insert.

After 18 years of cutting, hauling, splitting, stacking, and then dragging the messy crap into the house, I said the hell with it and went the pellet stove route. Now I have 3 tons of pellets delivered to my house. Store them in the basement and use them one 40 lb. bag at a time. No more of the above, and the pellet stove is way more efficient than a wood burner. Little or no ash to contend with and zero creosote to worry about in the 3 foot flu going out through the wall and terminating a foot above the ground. Soooooooo much better than burning firewood!
 
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Alternative suggestion: Install a pellet stove or fireplace insert.

After 18 years of cutting, hauling, splitting, stacking, and then dragging the messy crap into the house, I said the hell with it and went the pellet stove route. Now I have 3 tons of pellets delivered to my house. Store them in the basement and use them one 40 lb. bag at a time. No more of the above, and the pellet stove is way more efficient than a wood burner. Little or no ash to contend with and zero creosote to worry about in the 3 foot flu going out through the wall and terminating a foot above the ground. Soooooooo much better than burning firewood!
AMEN!!! Thank you lord! lol I still cut wood though, this is my first year with a pellet stove..so far...NO wood has been burned other than pellets. Talk about a SUPER easy life now..used to spend SO much time messing with wood...now i dump in a bag of firewood (pellets) and push a button..bingo!!
 

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If the tongue weight is lighter than the load in the bed technically the trailer will yield less wear on the machine...

...keep in mind though that the terrain will most likely dictate which method will produce more wear, for example, if your route has a lot of rocks/roots/etc that the trailer can get hung up on it could put A LOT more stress on the belt and axles versus just putting the load in your bed...

Another variable is the type of trailer, ie single axle versus double axle....also what type of suspension on the trailer will affect the stress on the machine...

My best success hauling heavy loads is by going nice and slow with a double walking beam axle trailer...

I agree - the only thing I can add to it is if you are concerned about the weight of a load on the hills look for a trailer that has independent brakes. we have a "ATV Wagon" brand trailer and while it has the 4 tires it also has electric brakes which really make it safer on our downhills. The 4 ATV style wheels take a lot of the weight off my machine, and also make it easier to move about off road. Not the cheapest game in town but ours has been mighty handy and I never had any concerns off road with it.
 

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Alternative suggestion: Install a pellet stove or fireplace insert.

After 18 years of cutting, hauling, splitting, stacking, and then dragging the messy crap into the house, I said the hell with it and went the pellet stove route. Now I have 3 tons of pellets delivered to my house. Store them in the basement and use them one 40 lb. bag at a time. No more of the above, and the pellet stove is way more efficient than a wood burner. Little or no ash to contend with and zero creosote to worry about in the 3 foot flu going out through the wall and terminating a foot above the ground. Soooooooo much better than burning firewood!
The only negative to that is you buy pellets. I can cut a years worth of firewood for a few bucks and some sweat equity. While I agree it is much easier and cleaner to go to pellets I will just stick with firewood....mainly because I am cheap and also because I enjoy the process.

Chainsaws are like bows, Rangers and trucks.....they are something I am drawn to.
 

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Quality wood pellets run $285 a ton here in Central NY. Takes 3 tons for our cold winters, late Springs. Seasoned firewood , cut off the property, is doable, but the older I get, the harder it is to do the chores of Youth. So pellets it is.
 

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Quality wood pellets run $285 a ton here in Central NY. Takes 3 tons for our cold winters, late Springs. Seasoned firewood , cut off the property, is doable, but the older I get, the harder it is to do the chores of Youth. So pellets it is.
I understand. There will be a time more than likely when I quit cutting wood but with my high efficiency stove I only burn maybe 1 to 1.5 cord a year. The only thing with my setup is I need to be cutting 2016 wood this season. I am just starting on my wood for 2 winters from now. Firewood needs to be really seasoned to burn in these new EPA compliant stoves.
 

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Quality wood pellets run $285 a ton here in Central NY. Takes 3 tons for our cold winters, late Springs. Seasoned firewood , cut off the property, is doable, but the older I get, the harder it is to do the chores of Youth. So pellets it is.

We're fortunate here I guess, quality Missouri hardwood pellets can be had for $190 per ton. I buy 3 tons each winter also and the lumber yard where I buy them delivers them all in one load for $25. They can't get their fork lift around to my basement door so I have them sit the pallets in the driveway and from there I use the Ranger to move them into my basement/shop. If I load it just right I can get 20 bags (800 lbs.) on the Ranger. Front end gets a little whippy but other than that it handles the load with no problem.

Having just hit 67, I understand exactly what you mean about the "chores of youth"!
 

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I understand. There will be a time more than likely when I quit cutting wood but with my high efficiency stove I only burn maybe 1 to 1.5 cord a year. The only thing with my setup is I need to be cutting 2016 wood this season. I am just starting on my wood for 2 winters from now. Firewood needs to be really seasoned to burn in these new EPA compliant stoves.
Good man!

In Nov' we finished piling our wood for next winter. Our wood is always seasoned a year before use. I have to wonder how the heat is from wood that is cut in the fall then burnt that winter. You see a lot of green firewood being hauled around here.
 

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Good man!

In Nov' we finished piling our wood for next winter. Our wood is always seasoned a year before use. I have to wonder how the heat is from wood that is cut in the fall then burnt that winter. You see a lot of green firewood being hauled around here.
In my previous stove I could get buy with burning green wood. It would burn but not super hot and would produce more creasote and ash. Trying to burn wood like that in my new stove is futile. I have found that year old wood is still too green. In 2 years I will know how well 2 yr seasoned wood works. Lol

The trick in Eastern KY is finding a somewhat flat spot to stack. One thing about this area is we have an abundance of hardwoods to burn. This stack is hickory, the bottom dark wood that I cut in the summer, and the lighter wood is white oak. Hickory by far is the hottest but it takes longer to season. Red Oak is my favorite. Hot, splits easy but does take a while to season.

 

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used to buy a log truck load of Red/White Oak, Cherry, and Locust for 600 bucks. Then Cut split stack all that. FIgure up time and labor and ya got quite a bit into it. Also wear and tear on the equipment (splitter, saws, Ranger etc etc) i bought 3 ton of somersets in the fall, just ordered another ton today, and ended up getting a ton of crappy pellets for 5 bucks. lol (won a raffle ticket, used money to score a sweet deal) Oh and i got 800 lbs of corn in the garage too. Imma TRY my hardest to make the pellet deal work cuz its EASY as pie! I love this thing. Had a hopper extension made for it so now it'll hold like 3.5 bags? So far ive had over 33 hours on a full load. Rough estimate of how long i could go from full to empty is like 50 hours? So far, i love the pellet stove, is it cheaper?...prolly not...honestly its probably more once ya figure everything in, but the time that ill gain and the ease of use is freaking sweeeeet! OHh, and i need to insulate my dumpy old home then it'll be more efficent..forgot about that factor.
 

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Maple, birch, oak & some ash in my part of Ontario.
 
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I like ash too revrnd. Never burned any birch to my knowledge and try not to burn maple. I split all my wood by hand so I try to get stuff with straight grain. Like I said...I like red oak the best but I will burn any hardwood. Locust and Osage orange is awesome too but it is so freaking hard sparks will fly from a chainsaw when you cut it. A chain is pretty much toast after tackling that stuff.
 

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Wagons ho ! As a parting shot, remember , just because you can tow something, doesn't mean you should. Whatever you got moving, also has to be stopped. Especially on a slight downhill grade. The electric brakes mentioned ealier make good sense, as would hydraulic surge brakes (until you back up).
 
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