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So to start out with I am clueless when it comes to mechanical issues but am willing to learn but I am trying to help my father with his 2007 Ranger 700 xp.

So there are a couple things going on.

Just prior to thanksgiving we installed a pair of snow trax. At this time the top speed was around 35-40 mph but was slower with a second adult in the vehicle to about 30 mph.

After installing the trax we started getting a smell of burning oil and it felt like we were loosing significant power there was a slight rattle I felt like there was something slipping and my mother reported that there was smoking in the vehicle cabin.

At this point I took off the side eqip. Box and looked at the belt. it appeared in really good shape. I did not see any ware areas and it appeared new. The clutch air intake was disconnected. I reattached it and hoped this was the cause.

Later it continued to worsen. So we pulled off the seat and discovered oil leaking from the air intake manifold boot and the oil breather gasket. we replaced both and leaks resolved. there is still a smell of burning oil but it might be residual. since then we removed the trax and the top speed is about 20 mph.
It seems we have lost significant compression.

I have checked the oil and it is reading high and smells slightly of gasoline and is honey colored. The air filter is clean and has no oil in the box. I will probably just drain the oil and refill but what should I look for to start fixing this problem its not easy to get it into the shop right now.

Do I need to get a compression gage and run though the process of testing compression of the engine or is there an air intake problem or am I in to deep and need to figure out a way to dig out the trailer so we can take it in.

Thank you
 

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Based upon what you've said this repair is going to be a significant challenge for someone with little to no mechanical experience. I don't say that to discourage you but rather to prepare you for the learning curve you will have to ascend to diagnose and make this repair.

First, I suggest you get a Service Manual. Digital versions are available on line for about $10 for most Polaris vehicles, and study it well. You are going to need some tools; wrenches, sockets, screwdrivers and I suggest a cylinder leak down tester which will also require an air compressor but is the most reliable and useful way to determine an engine's condition, far better than a simple compression tester. Videos are available on YouTube to assist in use of this tool.

A wild guess, based upon your description of the problem leads me to believe the engine has sustained damage to the piston, rings, cylinder, cylinder head and or gasket on any combination thereof, and possibly the lubrication system, water pump, crankshaft and connecting rods. I believe the most likely cause is low oil level, contaminated oil due to short runs without the engine being brought up to full operating temperature allowing oil dilution with gasoline, overheating and or engine that has been dusted, i.e. sucked in dirt via a torn intake boot or any combination thereof.

Unless you are willing to put forth significant effort to learn about rebuilding an engine it may be better for you to take it to a reliable shop or purchase a rebuilt engine from a provider such as nFlow. If you choose the latter I would still perform all diagnostics before purchasing a rebuilt engine and also be prepared for and willing to put forth the effort for removal and installation of the engine. I suggest taking many pictures as you perform disassembly to aid in reassembly.
 
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Discussion Starter #3
Based upon what you've said this repair is going to be a significant challenge for someone with little to no mechanical experience. I don't say that to discourage you but rather to prepare you for the learning curve you will have to ascend to diagnose and make this repair.

First, I suggest you get a Service Manual. Digital versions are available on line for about $10 for most Polaris vehicles, and study it well. You are going to need some tools; wrenches, sockets, screwdrivers and I suggest a cylinder leak down tester which will also require an air compressor but is the most reliable and useful way to determine an engine's condition, far better than a simple compression tester. Videos are available on YouTube to assist in use of this tool.

A wild guess, based upon your description of the problem leads me to believe the engine has sustained damage to the piston, rings, cylinder, cylinder head and or gasket on any combination thereof, and possibly the lubrication system, water pump, crankshaft and connecting rods. I believe the most likely cause is low oil level, contaminated oil due to short runs without the engine being brought up to full operating temperature allowing oil dilution with gasoline, overheating and or engine that has been dusted, i.e. sucked in dirt via a torn intake boot or any combination thereof.

Unless you are willing to put forth significant effort to learn about rebuilding an engine it may be better for you to take it to a reliable shop or purchase a rebuilt engine from a provider such as nFlow. If you choose the latter I would still perform all diagnostics before purchasing a rebuilt engine and also be prepared for and willing to put forth the effort for removal and installation of the engine. I suggest taking many pictures as you perform disassembly to aid in reassembly.
Thank you for the response. We have been waiting on a fuel pressure tester and a compression tester. We have the manual we are working through the engine we have a fuel pressure of 25 psi so we are replacing the pump filter and the regulator.

We will start working on the top end we have a compression tester it is reading 110 cold 130 warm and 160 wet, that being said during the wet test there was a mist from the attachment point and the spark plug seat. so we are going to test once we rebuild the fuel pump. as a side note we were having some sound of rocks during running and at shutoff a water drop bloop sound this was because the oil dipstick was loose. I do not know if these are normal sounds.

I will keep you updated when we test cylinder pressure again. If it is the same I am guessing it would be a top-end rebuild with o-ring and gasket replacement and possibly full rebuild I plan on getting a leak down tester if there is no improvement with tightening of the compression tester.
 

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Thank you for the response. We have been waiting on a fuel pressure tester and a compression tester. We have the manual we are working through the engine we have a fuel pressure of 25 psi so we are replacing the pump filter and the regulator.

We will start working on the top end we have a compression tester it is reading 110 cold 130 warm and 160 wet, that being said during the wet test there was a mist from the attachment point and the spark plug seat. so we are going to test once we rebuild the fuel pump. as a side note we were having some sound of rocks during running and at shutoff a water drop bloop sound this was because the oil dipstick was loose. I do not know if these are normal sounds.

I will keep you updated when we test cylinder pressure again. If it is the same I am guessing it would be a top-end rebuild with o-ring and gasket replacement and possibly full rebuild I plan on getting a leak down tester if there is no improvement with tightening of the compression tester.
I'm interested to hear how it comes out.
 

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J, you didn't mention the hrs/miles but if you only have 25 psi fuel pressure, I am surprised it ran at all. You would definitely be down on power with that as you should be able to hit 45-50 mph with any kind of rings left in the engine. Make sure you check the round black canister filter above the fuel pump . Try to blow thru it and see how much resistance there is. Normally by now they are plugged and most times cracked and dumping the fuel (and pressure) back in the tank. You would need to throw the filter away and replace it with fuel resistant fuel line and then put an inline filter after the tank.

If the TBAP harness has not been replaced feel for a taped up lump about 8" from the TBAP SENSOR...it is bad.. That will kill the power as well....



This high quality T-BAP repair harness typically fixes Polaris engine codes:


  • Blink code 41
  • Blink code 45
  • Blink code 46
  • SPN 102, FMI 3, 4, 2
  • SPN 105, FMI 3, 4

Some symptoms of a bad T-Bap harness are engine will run poorly, no power, poor idle and engine miss. This will be very noticeable when riding in changing elevations.

Oh yeah...check for stored EFI codes..


This harness will fit all Polaris EFI 700cc - 1000cc 550cc 570cc machines with the exception of the RZR 900.


Please do a visual comparison to make sure you are ordering the correct part.
 
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