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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A little while ago, I was doing some work on my XP900. One of the things I did was to correct the off-center steering wheel. My OCD kicked in and it was bugging the bejesus out of me. I did some reading on here and found that one way to get the stubborn thing off was to loosen the center nut, then give a few good whacks with a hammer while pulling on it. After finally getting it loose, I drove the Ranger down the driveway to find out exactly what position was the center, so I could line up the steering wheel. In doing so, I noticed the got tight when I tried turning to the right. Moments later, the wheel got tight any way I turned it, to the point where it doesn't feel like it has any EPS at all. In fact the Ranger will drive down the road now and the wheel will not move at all if I take my hands off of it...almost like it has and extremely overkill steering stabilizer on it. No trouble light on the display. I pulled the EPS relay under the seat, and that will make the light come on. Put the relay back in, and the light goes off, but no improvement with steering. I'm thinking that when I was banging on the steering shaft to get the steering wheel off, I damaged something in the EPS motor. Thoughts?
 

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Can't help w/EPS issue but for future reference the tie rods are adjustable. Just break the jam nut lose and twist the rod for steering adjustment
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I originally tried Ashanti g the tie rods to fix the problem. The amount of adjustment it needed was more than I could get with the tie rods. In doing that adjustment, I found that it adversely affected the turning radius too. Turning one direction would make an extremely tight turn, while turning the other way would require a country mile to make a turn.


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A little while ago, I was doing some work on my XP900. One of the things I did was to correct the off-center steering wheel. My OCD kicked in and it was bugging the bejesus out of me. I did some reading on here and found that one way to get the stubborn thing off was to loosen the center nut, then give a few good whacks with a hammer while pulling on it. After finally getting it loose, I drove the Ranger down the driveway to find out exactly what position was the center, so I could line up the steering wheel. In doing so, I noticed the got tight when I tried turning to the right. Moments later, the wheel got tight any way I turned it, to the point where it doesn't feel like it has any EPS at all. In fact the Ranger will drive down the road now and the wheel will not move at all if I take my hands off of it...almost like it has and extremely overkill steering stabilizer on it. No trouble light on the display. I pulled the EPS relay under the seat, and that will make the light come on. Put the relay back in, and the light goes off, but no improvement with steering. I'm thinking that when I was banging on the steering shaft to get the steering wheel off, I damaged something in the EPS motor. Thoughts?
Giving the upper steering shaft a few good whacks with a hammer on a EPS unit, was a $1200 mistake. And it doesn't help the pinion bearings in the steering rack on a non EPS unit either. The first thing to try is a steering wheel puller, if that does not work.
The safest way, although a little extra work, is to remove the upper steering shaft retaining bolt and nut at the EPS unit, remove the steering wheel tilt shock, remove the two retaining bolts ( one on each side of the steering pivot tube) and pull the assembly out.
Dating back to 2009 with the intro of EPS on the HD model, it has been stated in the polaris service manuals to NEVER hit the steering shaft with a hammer. (Striking the steering wheel or steering shaft while installed in the unit can permanently damage the EPS unit and cause a power steering fault).

If you decide not to go back with EPS, you can order the non EPS steering shaft for your unit. It is a direct bolt in.
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
That's what I was afraid of. I did try a puller at first, but it wouldn't budge. It actually started to deform the plastic of the steering wheel.


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When I went to the dealer to pick my 900 up I noticed the wheel was turned so one of the cross bars was covering the speedo. I asked for it to be corrected before I took the machine home so the sales guy says easy fix and proceds to go at the steering but nut and a sledge hammer while I stand back and watch. I had already found this forum and did some research on the power steering unit. So after about 20 min of him pounding the crap out of it. I say how about I just come back to following week to pick it up. He tuts the key on and the wheel turns to full lock. Yup junked the steering box. On the bright side they took one out of another new machine and straightend the wheel that Monday. I talked with the owner when I picked it up. All I can say is pissed. Lol
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
So here's the update...
Ordered a new P/S motor for $1600, which took forever to show up, but it finally came this past Saturday. I didn't have time this weekend to do it, but I just finished removing the old one and putting the new one in. In the process of disassembling the everything, I noticed that one of the rubber/metal bushing was deformed, and the rubber was trashed. I didn't think much about it, set it aside, and kept tearing the steering down. I compared the old and new motors side by side, and noticed I could easily spin the shafts on the old motor easily by hand. I thought 'thats odd', but didn't think much of it...again. Swapped the motors out and started putting things back together. I'll note at this point that there is one spline on the P/S motor input and output shafts is purposely deformed, and you have to make sure you line that up with the steering linkage. It only took me about 35 minutes to figure that out. :mad:
I left the steering wheel loose so I could take it for a drive and make sure I put it back on straight when the machine is going perfectly straight down the road. Got it in place and tightened up the nut a little bit. I went to turn around, and I find out that the steering is just as tight as it was with the old motor!!! WTF!! I loosen the nut up again, and voila, steering is just as it should be. It finally dawns on me that the bushing was the problem all along, and that the motor was probably fine all along!!!! I just ordered a new bushing and will soon find out if my suspicion was correct. If so, when I thought I had $1600 problem, I actually only had a $8.99 problem!!!! Again, I guess I am living up to my screen name....
Long story short, I may have a used P/S motor in working condition up for sale very soon. I'm so frustrated with myself that I don't think I'm even going to go back and swap them out again!
 

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Oh man, that's rough. But like I said, I've also done some doosies over the years.......and unnecessarily caused myself a lot of extra work and cash.

The good news is at least it's working.....the bad news is you might have to hang onto that motor a while before you can find a buyer.
 

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That, my friend, is a sad story. One for the grand kids. But, sounds like you'll be back on the road soon, albeit, with a little lighter wallet.:glee::encouragement:
 

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That is the saddest story I have heard from a garage in a long time. All I can say is that blows, big time. Thanks for sharing your troubles, though. Hopefully, someone else won't have to find out the hard way.
 

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We have all done it at some point.
I do not mean to add insult to injury, but it would have been cheaper to purchase the polaris eps unit as an accessory as opposed to purchasing it as a part.

I still think you may have damaged your eps unit.
The upper steering shaft rides in the shaft bushings, and it is possible you deformed the metal lip of the bushing, but it should not increase steering effort. The bushing would just spin inside the pivot tube with the bearing.

Can you post a pic of the steering bushing?
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
It was just the upper bushing that is destroyed...the bottom one is still OK. I'll post a pic of it tomorrow when I pull it out to replace it. I am having the new one overnighted.

I am curious about the EPS unit too, but as I mentioned the new unit was perfectly smooth up until I tightened the nut to hold the steering wheel in place. Just after that, the steering got tight/stiff, whatever you want to call it, just like when I thought the old unit took a dump. Loosened the nut up again, and steering was fine.

In my original post I stated that the wheel got tight when turning to the right, and soon after tight no mater what. I am wondering if originally I didn't have that bushing in there straight and it was causing a bind with the rubber part hanging up. So unless I got a bad new EPS unit, I have a feeling that the old unit is OK
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Alright so here is where I am....

The new bushing arrived. Doesn't take a genius to figure out which one is the new one.


I stuck the new one in place, put the steering wheel on, and started tightening the nut while the machine was running and I was moving the wheel back and forth. Just as before, as I tightened the nut, the wheel got harder and harder to move. For those that don't know it is a taper fit between the upper steering shaft and the steering wheel. When the bushing is in place, it covers up much of the taper, and leaves a small amount of threads available for the nut after the wheel is in place.



As I tightened the nut, the bushing was obviously getting pinched which was consequently making the steering wheel hard to turn. Now, if I leave the bushing out, the steering wheel has room to seat on the tapered shaft properly, and there are enough threads on the shaft for the nut to pinch it in place, while still being able to freely move.





Now here is the real kicker. My machine is a 2014. I looked at the 2014 parts fiche when I originally pulled the steering apart to straighten the steering wheel and to order the new bushing last night. However, I was using a 2013 XP900 service manual to tear down the dash when I was putting the new EPS unit in yesterday.


Here is the exploded view for the 2014 XP900. Notice where the two #18 bushings are.



Now here is the exploded view from the 2013 XP900 service manual


Notice anything???? The placement of the bushings are different in the illustrations. The '14 has a bushing on the outer side of each bearing, one upper and one lower, while the '13 is showing two bushings next to each other below the lower bearing. I'm not sure what the 'correct' order to install is, or if there truly is a difference here between the '13s and '14s (does't seem like there would be...) I know for a fact that I only have 1 lower bushing, as shown for the '14 model illustration, because I remember seeing it yesterday during the EPS unit swap. I decided to throw in the towel and put it back together without the top bushing. There is no excess play in the steering or rattling without the extra bushing, and it steers smoothly like it should. There a snowball's chance in hell that I'm going to take all the dash paneling and steering out just to stick a stupid bushing in there.

Time for a drink.....
 

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It stinks that you have to go through that much research to get it right. Glad you got it back together and working.
 

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Alright so here is where I am....

The new bushing arrived. Doesn't take a genius to figure out which one is the new one.


I stuck the new one in place, put the steering wheel on, and started tightening the nut while the machine was running and I was moving the wheel back and forth. Just as before, as I tightened the nut, the wheel got harder and harder to move. For those that don't know it is a taper fit between the upper steering shaft and the steering wheel. (It is not a taper fit between the steering wheel and the steering shaft. The aluminum insert inside the steering wheel, locates on the splines, the splines bottom out on the shoulder under the splines as well as the shoulder at the end of the taper on the upper steering shaft).When the bushing is in place, it covers up much of the taper, and leaves a small amount of threads available for the nut after the wheel is in place.



As I tightened the nut, the bushing was obviously getting pinched which was consequently making the steering wheel hard to turn. Now, if I leave the bushing out, the steering wheel has room to seat on the tapered shaft properly, and there are enough threads on the shaft for the nut to pinch it in place, while still being able to freely move.





Now here is the real kicker. My machine is a 2014. I looked at the 2014 parts fiche when I originally pulled the steering apart to straighten the steering wheel and to order the new bushing last night. However, I was using a 2013 XP900 service manual to tear down the dash when I was putting the new EPS unit in yesterday.


Here is the exploded view for the 2014 XP900. Notice where the two #18 bushings are.



Now here is the exploded view from the 2013 XP900 service manual


Notice anything???? The placement of the bushings are different in the illustrations. The '14 has a bushing on the outer side of each bearing, one upper and one lower, while the '13 is showing two bushings next to each other below the lower bearing. I'm not sure what the 'correct' order to install is, or if there truly is a difference here between the '13s and '14s (does't seem like there would be...) I know for a fact that I only have 1 lower bushing, as shown for the '14 model illustration, because I remember seeing it yesterday during the EPS unit swap. I decided to throw in the towel and put it back together without the top bushing. There is no excess play in the steering or rattling without the extra bushing, and it steers smoothly like it should. There a snowball's chance in hell that I'm going to take all the dash paneling and steering out just to stick a stupid bushing in there.

Time for a drink.....
Disregard the illustration in the 13' service manual, it is not correct. The illustration you have for the 14' is the same assembly for the 13'.
Looking at your pics, your problem I believe is you have two bushings on the bottom side of the pivot tube, the upper steering shaft has a shoulder on it that retains the bushing. When assembled properly the rubber bushings keeps slight tension on the upper steering assembly, the idea is to keep it from rattling.
If you lay down in the floorboard and look up at the pivot tube I think you will see two bushings on the bottom. If not, then the bottom bearing has moved lower in the pivot tube and is not allowing the steering shaft to fully extend through the upper part of the pivot tube.
Just looked at mine, it is disassembled laying on my work bench.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I know for a fact that I don't have two bushings on the bottom. When I had it apart yesterday, I checked the bottom one after seeing the top one was destroyed. Upon reassembly, I put it back together per the '14 diagram. Perhaps the bottom bearing did move. When I'm feeling ambitious, I'll rip it all apart again.


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