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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A friend killed by an inadequately secured trailered vehicle comes to mind every time I load my Ranger, so I have been scouring these forums for your ideas and examples on a trailer tie-down system. Here’s what I ended up with so far.

Trainman200 put me on a new trailer, heavily and locally built 14 foot by 77 inch wide version with a folding ramp to reduce wind drag from http://www.aaatrailersales.net/ or https://www.facebook.com/AaaTrailerSales in NE Texas.
Vehicle Trailer Automotive exterior Iron Bumper


The farm/hunting area has enough gravel roads that dirt and mud made me hate dealing with tie-down straps; and after reading through the different opinions on safety and suspension compression, I ended up with the LA Trailer Dog mounted on the front center of the trailer, leaving the mounting plate off the back of the floor. www.laguarddog.com After mounting as far forward on the trailer floor as I could, I custom ordered a shortened “coupler head” to move the Ranger forward about 3 more inches which helped compensate for the weight of the rear engine on the 900 by adding a bit more stabilizing tongue weight.



A KFI lower front hitch receiver was added to preserve the stock winch location. I found the best price at www.ruralking.com
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Rubber Wheel Chocks were mounted to the trailer floor for easier Ranger placement to secure with the Trailer Dog. I used Rubber Wheel Chock (WC1467A) | Welcome to Buyers Products Company
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Because some states require a 4 point system, I added a set of safety chains to the rear of the trailer connected to the safety chain loops on the Ranger hitch receiver. There are multiple ways to accomplish the same goal, but I decided on a removable safety chain system that can be stored when not in use. The chains are anchored to the trailer with 5,000 lb. Ericson Removable Anchor Rings found locally at Orscheln Farm and Home They are mounted at the same level as the hitch receiver safety chain attachment holes; but at least for now, aren’t intended to be taunt. To keep the chains removable with hooks at each end, it either requires a bit of slack, or possibly attaching the chains prior to moving the Ranger forward to secure it with the Trailer Dog; which I haven’t tried yet.
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I used 5,000 lb. Curt Hooks from www.etrailer.com on each end of the safety chain, again to permit removal and storage.
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Because I wanted high visibility to compensate for forgetfulness, I kinda cheaped out in the chain rating department by using 5/16[SUP]th[/SUP] welded orange powder coated chain with a 1,900 lb. rating.

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Storage so far is a two part idea with a permanently bed mounted black powder coated 30 x 12 x 11”Better Built ATV tote tool box (no handles) on one side of the Trailer Dog at the front of the trailer, mounted backward to keep mud out of the latch & lock. I happened to find the best price at Cabelas when they were offering free shipping. I custom cut some horse stall mat to avoid denting the sides with the drop down hitch and ball that I keep stored inside when not towing the Ranger, along with anything else I want to keep for towing/trailer purposes.
Product Bumper Automotive exterior Gun Vehicle


To balance out the front of the trailer, on the other side of the Trailer Dog, I am adding another storage box; this one is an economical, lightweight, structural foam storage box from Walmart. The purpose is to have it removable from the trailer to the bed of the Ranger, and carry items that I might only use on longer trail rides, and wouldn’t carry when at the ranch working or hunting. The indentions in the top are handy to temporarily place latch pins and other small items when securing the Ranger on the trailer.

I don’t yet have the quick-detachable mounting system onto the trailer figured out yet, so I can easily move it back and forth from the trailer bed to the ranger bed, so I’m hoping to hear some ideas from you.
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Part 2 will follow since ten photos are all that are allowed on a single post. (Sorry for some oversize photos, don't know how to resize them.)
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 · (Edited)
PART 2 added as a reply.
Following you guys advise when trailering, I leave the Ranger in neutral with the parking brake engaged in transport, using the Pawltector Parking Brake from [email protected]

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The rear safety chains ended up like this.
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Excuse the mud. Here’s the result so far. I am also considering adding gravel shields in front of each storage box, leaving open the area in front of the Trailer Dog to have more room when cinching it down. On late, hurried arrivals, it helps, when backing off the trailer, to release both the parking brake and the Trailer Dog!


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Looking for comments to improve or fine tune the idea.
 

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maybe a pindle hitch then you could drive up hit it and latched ? T&S looks good you can never tie them enough
 
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Hello.
I have a 2012 Ranger 800 XP. Could you mount the lock down system on the rear of the trailer? My trailer is very similar to the one you picture.
I like the system but don't really want to mount a receiver on the front of my bike.
Thanks
Vci
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Vic, yes you can mount the Trailer Dog on the rear of your trailer. In my case with the storage boxes on the front of my 14' trailer, I was forced to mount it so far back that my stock height ranger would not clear the mounting plate height. I could have eliminated the storage boxes and used a rear mounting location, but didn't want to lose the storage.

BTW, good to see another retired leo. I retired last September after a combined 38 years, local police patrolman and Oklahoma Highway Patrol Communications Lt. I love retirement, but miss my team.
 

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While I like the dog tie down. How is it a 4 point tie? Looks like 3 to me. Also would DOT let those chains pass? # maybe.?? But need binders on each one. Here at least. Iowa. You know the rules better than I do. Just asking. Thanks
 

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A friend killed by an inadequately secured trailered vehicle comes to mind every time I load my Ranger, so I have been scouring these forums for your ideas and examples on a trailer tie-down system. Here’s what I ended up with so far.

Trainman200 put me on a new trailer, heavily and locally built 14 foot by 77 inch wide version with a folding ramp to reduce wind drag from Home | AAA Trailer Sales | Flatbed, Equipment, Utility, and Fuel Tank Trailers For Sale in Petty, TX or https://www.facebook.com/AaaTrailerSales in NE Texas.
View attachment 8889

The farm/hunting area has enough gravel roads that dirt and mud made me hate dealing with tie-down straps; and after reading through the different opinions on safety and suspension compression, I ended up with the LA Trailer Dog mounted on the front center of the trailer, leaving the mounting plate off the back of the floor. www.laguarddog.com After mounting as far forward on the trailer floor as I could, I custom ordered a shortened “coupler head” to move the Ranger forward about 3 more inches which helped compensate for the weight of the rear engine on the 900 by adding a bit more stabilizing tongue weight.
View attachment 8890


A KFI lower front hitch receiver was added to preserve the stock winch location. I found the best price at www.ruralking.com
View attachment 8891


Rubber Wheel Chocks were mounted to the trailer floor for easier Ranger placement to secure with the Trailer Dog. I used Rubber Wheel Chock (WC1467A) | Welcome to Buyers Products Company
View attachment 8893 View attachment 8892


Because some states require a 4 point system, I added a set of safety chains to the rear of the trailer connected to the safety chain loops on the Ranger hitch receiver. There are multiple ways to accomplish the same goal, but I decided on a removable safety chain system that can be stored when not in use. The chains are anchored to the trailer with 5,000 lb. Ericson Removable Anchor Rings found locally at Orscheln Farm and Home They are mounted at the same level as the hitch receiver safety chain attachment holes; but at least for now, aren’t intended to be taunt. To keep the chains removable with hooks at each end, it either requires a bit of slack, or possibly attaching the chains prior to moving the Ranger forward to secure it with the Trailer Dog; which I haven’t tried yet.
View attachment 8894



I used 5,000 lb. Curt Hooks from www.etrailer.com on each end of the safety chain, again to permit removal and storage.
View attachment 8895

Because I wanted high visibility to compensate for forgetfulness, I kinda cheaped out in the chain rating department by using 5/16[SUP]th[/SUP] welded orange powder coated chain with a 1,900 lb. rating.

View attachment 8896

Storage so far is a two part idea with a permanently bed mounted black powder coated 30 x 12 x 11”Better Built ATV tote tool box (no handles) on one side of the Trailer Dog at the front of the trailer, mounted backward to keep mud out of the latch & lock. I happened to find the best price at Cabelas when they were offering free shipping. I custom cut some horse stall mat to avoid denting the sides with the drop down hitch and ball that I keep stored inside when not towing the Ranger, along with anything else I want to keep for towing/trailer purposes.
View attachment 8897

To balance out the front of the trailer, on the other side of the Trailer Dog, I am adding another storage box; this one is an economical, lightweight, structural foam storage box from Walmart. The purpose is to have it removable from the trailer to the bed of the Ranger, and carry items that I might only use on longer trail rides, and wouldn’t carry when at the ranch working or hunting. The indentions in the top are handy to temporarily place latch pins and other small items when securing the Ranger on the trailer.

I don’t yet have the quick-detachable mounting system onto the trailer figured out yet, so I can easily move it back and forth from the trailer bed to the ranger bed, so I’m hoping to hear some ideas from you.
View attachment 8898

Part 2 will follow since ten photos are all that are allowed on a single post. (Sorry for some oversize photos, don't know how to resize them.)
I certainly hate hearing this and agree with the importance of doing it correctly to securing a load. I think people grossly underestimate what might happen in a crash if a 1500 lb object becomes mobile during transportation for the individual pulling as well as the unexpected individuals traveling on the highway we share.
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
Steve, you're right. I omitted that I am considering another chain-curt hook combo up front for the 4th attachment point. I haven't taken it by for a DOT inspection yet, and the chain may have to be upgraded, although not being a commercial motor vehicle, requirements may not be the same. If so, it will be super easy with this style curt hooks. Thanks for the input.
 

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That has to be a faster connect/disconnect process than the four tire bonnets that I use. I know (because I tried it) that using only tire bonnets on the front that the rear end will move all over the place. So I use four now just to be absolutely certain that it isn't going to move. I do like that the Ranger's suspension is still active with the tire bonnets. Less road vibration is transmitted to the body of the Ranger that way. Over the long run maybe things won't fall apart as much.
 

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The front hitch is fine but the rear is lacking severely, you can stop or be stopped quicker than you can accelerate. Bigger chain and put tension on the chain so the Ranger wont flip over front wise in an accident. A friend of mine had a 1972 Corvette on a trailer and was hit head on, the Vett landed on the tow vehicle upside down totaling the Vett and tow vehicle.


PART 2 added as a reply.
Following you guys advise when trailering, I leave the Ranger in neutral with the parking brake engaged in transport, using the Pawltector Parking Brake from [email protected]

View attachment 8899

The rear safety chains ended up like this.
View attachment 8903


Excuse the mud. Here’s the result so far. I am also considering adding gravel shields in front of each storage box, leaving open the area in front of the Trailer Dog to have more room when cinching it down. On late, hurried arrivals, it helps, when backing off the trailer, to release both the parking brake and the Trailer Dog!


View attachment 8900 View attachment 8901 View attachment 8902


Looking for comments to improve or fine tune the idea.
 

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I must be the only person who uses ratchet straps, 2" wide(10,000 lb) and 4" wide depending on what I'm strapping down. The chains on the rear in your pic are useless in my opinion. You have stake pockets to hook the straps into , over the rear hitch, up past the tires out to the stake pockets. A ratchet will suck the machine right down. Go through the front bumper, same thing , out to the pockets, ratchet it down. Your going to a lot of work to be safe. Straps are safe, Never break, and you don't need to be a eagle scout to tie the knot. Just yank tight , ratchet it down. Run a 3rd and 4th strap right across the floorboards out each side to the stake pockets(front and rear sitting floorboards). It won't move.
 

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I've been using 1.5" ratchet straps off each corner and the dang things Always come loose. I've been looking for a better towing setup.
 

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Your trailer looks great and your tie downs all are the secure type. Going beyond the norm when it comes to safety is always first in my book, good job.

John
 

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I like that idea of going through the wheels. I hadn't thought of that. Makes sense to allow the suspension to still work without the straps on the frame floating up and down with the frame.
 

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I like that idea of going through the wheels. I hadn't thought of that. Makes sense to allow the suspension to still work without the straps on the frame floating up and down with the frame.
It's the best way to go, holds the buggies rock solid like the tires are super glued on the trailer and none of the energy from the suspension comes into play. If you are not careful, especially on side by sides binding the suspension down will make bad things happen, I've seen it first hand. Bonnets do the same but are not as versatile, you have to have e-track or tie down points in front of and behind each wheel and that limits your options when hauling different machines in different positions.
 

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The problem with through the wheel straps you have to have wheels that you can get the strap through. I do not have that option as I am still running the stock steel wheels, I am looking into using wheel bonnets secured to a e-track system. While my trailer is 99.9% used for my ranger and daughters 90cc 4 wheeler, I have extra tie down points if needed for hauling other items.
 

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To the OP. There's a forestry company here that requires the four wheelers to be secured in their trucks using the same namebrand hitch setup that you are using on the front. They seem to work good. Is your floor mount just bolted to the wood trailer floor or is there some metal support or a plate under the floor. If not, I'd be worried about the mounting bolts pulling through the wood if much force was put on them. I'd take the slack out of the rear chains too. Weight that is allowed to move can put a lot more force on the chains, a pull vs. a snatch.

I'm with stainlessman on using 2" straps. If I'm going very far, I put 2- 2" straps on both ends and suck it down tight. I've got some smaller straps but I'd never trust the rachets on them to hold a Ranger. I've hauled a lot of vehicles cross country and I quit using bonnet and wheel straps. I still used bonnet straps on wheel lifts for short distances, but quit them altogether on a trailer. One reason is when the suspension is left "live" the weight can cause the trailers center of gravity to change and even fish tail. Another reason, is that tires can flex letting your wheel straps and bonnets get loose. I've seen vehicles move to one side and the have the tires on the opposite side about to pop off the rim, while the other is so loose it's not even on the tire. When the suspension isn't compressed and the weight is allowed to move... it can move. LOL For me, static weight is just safer to haul than live weight.
 

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Sorry it took so long to reply. Yep I was on the job for 30 years and really miss the people I worked with. Best job one could ever have. I tell people where else could you play cops and robbers and never have to grow up. I retired as a M/Sgt.
Vic
 
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To the OP. There's a forestry company here that requires the four wheelers to be secured in their trucks using the same namebrand hitch setup that you are using on the front. They seem to work good. Is your floor mount just bolted to the wood trailer floor or is there some metal support or a plate under the floor. If not, I'd be worried about the mounting bolts pulling through the wood if much force was put on them. I'd take the slack out of the rear chains too. Weight that is allowed to move can put a lot more force on the chains, a pull vs. a snatch.


I'm with stainlessman on using 2" straps. If I'm going very far, I put 2- 2" straps on both ends and suck it down tight. I've got some smaller straps but I'd never trust the rachets on them to hold a Ranger. I've hauled a lot of vehicles cross country and I quit using bonnet and wheel straps. I still used bonnet straps on wheel lifts for short distances, but quit them altogether on a trailer. One reason is when the suspension is left "live" the weight can cause the trailers center of gravity to change and even fish tail. Another reason, is that tires can flex letting your wheel straps and bonnets get loose. I've seen vehicles move to one side and the have the tires on the opposite side about to pop off the rim, while the other is so loose it's not even on the tire. When the suspension isn't compressed and the weight is allowed to move... it can move. LOL For me, static weight is just safer to haul than live weight.
Maybe if not done right or on a very light trailer and or tow vehicle. There is a reason car haulers, Jeepers etc do not suck down the suspension and it is the same reason sucking it down on a Ranger is not a good idea, in fact it is even worse due to the soft suspension and amount of travel they have. I used to do it how you do and would have sworn it was the best way after a good many miles doing it that way then I hit the right dip going about 75 on the interstate and had brand new heavy 2" straps pop like rubber bands and was left with just the parking brake hold the machines on. I do prefer the through the wheel method to the bonnets because bonnets need to be sized and installed right to be secure enough and are not as versatile. I travel very long distances with 2 full size Rangers and usually a four wheeler Rhino or RZR in the bed of my truck and nothing even things about moving. They all just float calmly on their suspension.
 
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