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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello
I have a 2004 series 11 Polaris ranger 4X4 that has a carb. I bought ii new and have never had any problems with it.
Now all of a sudden this occurs. Turn key to on position -- fuel pump runs for a short while then stops. Turn key to
the start position and it starts as always, but now it only runs for a few minutes and then stops. When I repeat this
it always starts fine but then "stalls" after a few minutes acting like it isn't getting any gas.
I replaced the fuel pump thinking it might be bad, it didn't help. Then I noticed that the fuel pump would pump plenty
of gas to the carb for a few seconds and then shut off when the ignition key was turned to the "on" position. When I
would start the machine the fuel pump never turns on to continue pumping gas to the carb. Do any of you have any
ideas about what could be wrong with it. The dealer is backed up in the service department for several months and
I am lost without my old workhorse. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
Thank you
Lance Workman
 

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2015 Polaris ranger 570 XP
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My guess would be a stuck float and possibly some nasties in the float bowl. Pull the carb, carefully disassemble, document parts orientation if you aren't familiar with how things go back together, clean with carb spray, compressed air and some small copper wire strands from stranded wire that you strip and unwrap. Don't use steel wire to push through jets or small openings as it can scratch and change flow of fuel. I like to use hardwood or a piece of copper tubing flattened and filed to a sharp edge for any scraping on soft metals like aluminum or zinc to prevent damage. If you're careful you may be able to reuse any gaskets or "O" rings and reassemble. If you see gaskets or other rubber parts deteriorated or hardened get a rebuild kit.
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
My guess would be a stuck float and possibly some nasties in the float bowl. Pull the carb, carefully disassemble, document parts orientation if you aren't familiar with how things go back together, clean with carb spray, compressed air and some small copper wire strands from stranded wire that you strip and unwrap. Don't use steel wire to push through jets or small openings as it can scratch and change flow of fuel. I like to use hardwood or a piece of copper tubing flattened and filed to a shar edge for any scraping on soft metals like aluminum or zinc to prevent damage. If you're careful you may be able to reuse any gaskets or "O" rings and reassemble. If you see gaskets or other rubber parts deteriorated or hardened get a rebuild kit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you for your quick reply pyromedic. Because the ranger starts so well and the fact that no gas is being pumped
to the carb after it starts made me bypass the idea of the carb itself being the problem. I have a Model A car and two
motorcycles so I have cleaned a few carbs before. Your tips on how to do it were appreciated. If I don;t get any more
replies, I will tackle cleaning the carb this weekend. Thanks again for the suggestion.
Lance Workman
 

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Because the ranger starts so well and the fact that no gas is being pumped
to the carb after it starts made me bypass the idea of the carb itself being the problem.
Lance Workman
I'm happy to help. Perhaps I misunderstood your problem. You stated you replaced the fuel pump so I assumed that gas was being pumped at least as far as the carburetor inlet but as I understand it now fuel isn't being pumped even after fuel pump replacement. If that is correct, assuming the pump is electric, perhaps the problem lies in the wiring, ignition switch, fuel pressure regulator or a fuel pump relay.
I am not familiar with your exact model so again I am making assumptions that your vehicle is equipped with at least some of the components mentioned above. If you haven't done so it would be an easy matter to remove the fuel line from the carburetor, turn the key to the run position and see if the pump fills a small container rather quickly. If it does I think the next test would be a fuel pressure test to see if pressure is within specifications. If all that checks out then the carburetor is a likely culprit. A sticking float may allow fuel to enter the carburetor at one moment and then stick closed the next. If the float itself is brass or plastic and has been holed it will sink and allow unchecked fuel flow, which doesn't sound like the problem you have. If the float is a composite type it may become saturated with fuel with time and no longer react as quickly to the flow requirements. Of course you could also have a combination of problems which can only be discovered by testing adn inspection. Best of luck, let us know what you find.
 
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