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I have a polaris glacier hydraulic plow that I’m having problems with. Has anyone had a problem it not wanting to go up and down. It works fine from side to side but just won’t go up or down. Can anyone tell be what it could be. I’ve had this plow ever since I bought my bike new in 2012 and have never had a problem with it untitling year. It is installed the Wright way. It seems to work when the weather is warm but when the temperature drop down it stops working up and dow.
Greg
 

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I'm now having the same issues. Our first snow fall that I used it for was really wet. I am guessing that water got into the motor somewhere and now freezes up. If I point a knipco at the lift and turn rams for 5 minutes it works, and it will continue to work until I park it in the cold and it freezes up again. Anyone have a parts diagram of the motors? I would like to take the apart and let the dry out but would like to see a diagram of the electrical first.
 

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I don't have a Glacier Plow, however, most things that use an electric motor require a relay somewhere in the system becasue the amperage draw is too high to run it all through a control switch. Relays can be finicky when they get wet or when it's cold. They tend to stick or don't make connection internally. Relays are not expensive and since intermitten electrical problems can be difficult to resolve, I suggest finding the relays and replacing them with new to see if that cures the problem.
 

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I don't have a Glacier Plow, however, most things that use an electric motor require a relay somewhere in the system becasue the amperage draw is too high to run it all through a control switch. Relays can be finicky when they get wet or when it's cold. They tend to stick or don't make connection internally. Relays are not expensive and since intermitten electrical problems can be difficult to resolve, I suggest finding the relays and replacing them with new to see if that cures the problem.
I have checked the relays. I also have power down to the rams when I push the switches. Also when I push the switch to raise the plow the lights dim more than they normally do. This would tell me that the power draw is more than normal. So then would also think the electric motor is frozen. The relays are under the hood, and if I run a knipco heater and point it at the rams for a few minutes they magically start working. There wouldn't be any heat getting to the relays.
The rams are supposed to be rated at ip67 so wet snow shouldn't bother them, but looks like somehow it is.
I now have the plow in my heated garage for the weekend to see if something will somehow dry out.
 

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I have the Glacier Pro on mine and have never had that problem ( mostly because it is stored in heated environment in the winter)
With that said, I do think it it a moisture problem with the fluid. I was going to drain and refill the hyd. fluid in mine but never found a good fill or drain point. And now is not the right time to do so in case there is a delay on parts (if necessary)

This is what you have:


I have been trying to get some better information on them mechanically but there is not a lot of information out there.
I would like the action to speed up, hyd side to side and up and down have been slow from the beginning.
 

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It does sound as though the motor is drawing more current than it should. You could check it with an ammeter and compare to the specs for the motor to confirm. If the motor is drawing more current than it should it may be that the bearings ahve gotten rusty from exposure to water/salt while plowing, that the grease in the bearings has gotten thick with age and the cold makes it even stiffer or perhaps the pivots that the plow bears on to move up and down is tight, worn, misaligned and binding or needs lubrication.
I'd check the plow for freedom of movement when cold by disconnecting the motor/ elevating mechanism and moving it by hand to assure free movement. If everything moves freely it may be time to dig into the motor lift mechanism to check bearings, lubrication, for corrosion, etc. As I say I'm not familiar with that plow but a motor will draw additional amperage when load is increased by additional friction.
 
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