PRC Polaris Ranger Club banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
22,346 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Although I hope you never need to use it, maybe this will help a few members that do.












Sorry for the ameteur camera work, but I think they provide enough info' to be helpful.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24,233 Posts
Excellent job Jerry, hopefully that will bail somebody out of a mess someday.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
73 Posts
Great videos. I have a 2007, hope I never have to use it. Jerry, you must have good knees and back. I would have to do that at a bench sitting on a bar stool.

Butch
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22,346 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
butcha said:
Great videos. I have a 2007, hope I never have to use it. Jerry, you must have good knees and back. I would have to do that at a bench sitting on a bar stool.

Butch
Not as good as they used to be :lol: .

A bench definitely would have been nice, but I don't have that luxury at my house where the filming was done. I typically do most of my work at my shop where I have all of the tools and room that I need.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22,346 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
I've had several members ask if I had pic's on what sort of damage to look for when tearing their tranny apart. I'm in the process of rebuilding this one for another member and thought I'd take some pic's while I had the opportunity. Below are some pic's of one of the most common issues......worn shift dogs :x . This is typically caused by not coming to a stop when changing gears.

The pic's show the upper gear cluster from the rear of the tranny (driver's side would be on the left, passenger's side to the right). Here is a pic' of the high range shift dog. The screwdriver is pointing toward the damaged dog. The high gear dogs are the furthest to the left.


Here's a close-up of that same high gear dog. Notice the damaged corner. This amount of damage is considered EXTREMELY bad, and this tranny would no longer go/stay in high range.


Here is the reverse shift dog. It is located in the center of the gear cluster.


Here's a close-up of the reverse dog. Notice the damage is minimal, but this is still probably enough to cause some grinding and/or popping out of gear.


Here is a pic' of the low range dog. It is the furthest to the left (toward the passenger side of the machine).


Here is a close-up of the low range dog. This one has no damage and is how a good one should look.......nice, square edges with no wear or indications of rounding.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top