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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My friend's 2011 ranger 800 crew had a total engine failure due to a thrust plate screw falling into the timing gears and caused a sheared camshaft. I have finished rebuilding the engine in its entirety, (new: pistons, camshaft, lifters, valves, and all new gears) but I have a few questions about the mechanical water pump seal. I replaced the one that was installed but i didn't have a socket that would fit around the seal properly so instead I lightly tapped it with a brass punch all the way around it as evenly as I could, Unfortunately about half way down I had to use some force so Even though it is fully seated down the perimeter of it has some dings in it. From my understanding the actual sealing element of that seal is the blue silicone that's around the seal correct? What are the chances that my seal actually leaks? I apologise for any inexperience on this matter, it's the 1st ranger engine I've rebuilt and one of my 1st full engine rebuilds. Any input and advice is appreciated!

P.s. We are still waiting for a stater cover gasket so the engine has not been installed, it's not too late to replace The mechanical water pump seal and the oil pump seal behind it (if need be) with the engine on the bench.
 

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My friend's 2011 ranger 800 crew had a total engine failure due to a thrust plate screw falling into the timing gears and caused a sheared camshaft. I have finished rebuilding the engine in its entirety, (new: pistons, camshaft, lifters, valves, and all new gears) but I have a few questions about the mechanical water pump seal. I replaced the one that was installed but i didn't have a socket that would fit around the seal properly so instead I lightly tapped it with a brass punch all the way around it as evenly as I could, Unfortunately about half way down I had to use some force so Even though it is fully seated down the perimeter of it has some dings in it. From my understanding the actual sealing element of that seal is the blue silicone that's around the seal correct? What are the chances that my seal actually leaks? I apologise for any inexperience on this matter, it's the 1st ranger engine I've rebuilt and one of my 1st full engine rebuilds. Any input and advice is appreciated!

P.s. We are still waiting for a stater cover gasket so the engine has not been installed, it's not too late to replace The mechanical water pump seal and the oil pump seal behind it (if need be) with the engine on the bench.
My friend's 2011 ranger 800 crew had a total engine failure due to a thrust plate screw falling into the timing gears and caused a sheared camshaft. I have finished rebuilding the engine in its entirety, (new: pistons, camshaft, lifters, valves, and all new gears) but I have a few questions about the mechanical water pump seal. I replaced the one that was installed but i didn't have a socket that would fit around the seal properly so instead I lightly tapped it with a brass punch all the way around it as evenly as I could, Unfortunately about half way down I had to use some force so Even though it is fully seated down the perimeter of it has some dings in it. From my understanding the actual sealing element of that seal is the blue silicone that's around the seal correct? What are the chances that my seal actually leaks? I apologise for any inexperience on this matter, it's the 1st ranger engine I've rebuilt and one of my 1st full engine rebuilds. Any input and advice is appreciated!

P.s. We are still waiting for a stater cover gasket so the engine has not been installed, it's not too late to replace The mechanical water pump seal and the oil pump seal behind it (if need be) with the engine on the bench.
I understand why people use secondary methods when a special tool is required, but over many, many years of working on equipment of all types, I have found that stopping what I am doing and purchasing the proper tool pays off, plus it gives you piece of mind when you close up a gearbox after installing a part that required a special tool. Until you run the engine you will not know if the seal leaks. If you are truly concerned, buy another seal and the proper seal driver and reinstall it. It may save you time in the long run!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
I understand why people use secondary methods when a special tool is required, but over many, many years of working on equipment of all types, I have found that stopping what I am doing and purchasing the proper tool pays off, plus it gives you piece of mind when you close up a gearbox after installing a part that required a special tool. Until you run the engine you will not know if the seal leaks. If you are truly concerned, buy another seal and the proper seal driver and reinstall it. It may save you time in the long run!

I understand completely, im coming fr
Just a question about that seal though, that blue sealant is the sealing element to the case correct? Its not like its a flared pipe (metal to metal) seal right?
 

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If you are truly concerned, buy another seal and the proper seal driver and reinstall it.
Much easier to change that seal on the bench then in the Ranger. A new seal that comes with the driver can be purchased on Amazon for about $50.
 
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