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Discussion Starter #1
I have a buddie with a new 2013 900 Ranger. He has been haveing problems when the temp is below 20 degrees his ranger will not start. He has changed the plugs and it really did not make a difference. He has talked to the dealer here and they have not come up with anything. He has checked the machine when it doesnt start and it is getting fuel and spark but will not start. When it is above freezing it starts good. Kind of a hit and miss thing. So I was wondering if anyone was haveing a problem like this. I have 2010 800xp and it makes him a little upset when my ranger fires right up. He has been pretty patient but it is starting to get a little old.
Thanks for any advice on a possible fix.
Frank
 

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Hasn't been that cold here yet. Temp suppose to get in single digits next few days. Will check it then. Has been in the 20's with no issues.
 

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Just test drove a unit (and bought it) and it was -22C.. Yes.. -22C (-8F) and the unit had been sitting at that temp for 2 weeks without running.... We had some trouble starting..

Here is the secret.. You must turn the key on and off 2 - 3 times to prime the fuel pump.. #2... DO NOT Touch the gas peddle.. The salesmen did this and caused the unit to flood.. Had to wait 20 min before we could try again. After that.. Turned key on and off 3 times, then spun it over.. Started withing 2 seconds.. Died once, repeat and it restarted and stayed running.

People forget that these are fuel injected (throttle body) and try to start them like a carb or DFI engine. You just have to make sure the throttle body has fuel, then let the computer do the rest.
 

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These polaris engines are DFI or directly fuel injected via the two injectors. Your foot feed controls the throttle body which controls the air intake of the engine. The TPS will be set with a value that is set by polaris for an easy start method. The IAC or idle/air control will work the throttle body via a servo motor to control the amount of air passing through the throttle body. The MAP sensor will watch the Absolute manifold Pressure which in turn determines the required fuel for combustion. Usually these ECU's will have different settings written in the air map during startup until warmed up. Now the 900 doesnt have a throttle cable like the old ones so not sure exactly what settings are when started. I would make sure it has good 87 octane gas, plugs aren't fouled and no codes. The fuel pump should prime as soon as you turn on key no need to cycle it it either has the recommended fuel pressure as soon as its turned on or it don't if fuel pressure is low it will not start.
 

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While I agree %100 with dobber97 and he has obviously researched (or is a Technician) I have to disagree with the no cycle theory. Although theory says you shouldn't require a cycle to build pressure it doesn't seem to pan out in real world. Both the 900 and 800 I test drove needed a cycle or they wouldn't start (at -22C).

One very important thing he said is regarding to fuel.. Make sure you are using 87 octane.. NOT FARM, DYED, RED, PURPLE of subsidized fuel. I own a small engine repair shop and have at least 2 repairs a week due to fuel. I wouldn't call them repairs, because we don't actually do any work except drain the shit fuel and replace with quality regular grade fuel. I then spend an hour convincing the customer that is all we did.. In some cases I've had to drain the good fuel and replace with the bad (usually Red or Purple fuel) to prove my point.

If you live in a very cold climate and have toys, you will know that octane is king when talking about cold starting.

Have your buddy try regular fuel from a high volume station (along with the other advise) and see if the problem goes away.

P.S. If you are wondering "What the hell is RED or PURPLE Fuel". Its something that is unique to Alberta Canada. We allow farmers to buy fuel at a discount for farming use. They put dye in it to differentiate if from normal fuel (so it is RED or PURPLE in color). Every so often we have a "Dip stop" where police dip peoples fuel tanks and write tickets for any non farmer using RED or PURPLE fuel (very large fine $500+). Problem with RED or PURPLE fuel is the octane is about 82 as it is meant for farm tractors or vehicles from the 80s.
 

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Sounds a lot like water in the fuel system (probably in the tank). Try running some fuel additive through it like Sea Foam. I've heard that "Heet" gas dryer also works well for removing water.
 

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I only use 91+ ethanol free octane, always fresh clean fuel. I always turn the key one click and wait a second before starting engine when cold, I don't know why I do that just a habit from always having to wait to start diesels I guess.
 

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Combination of elevation and associated programming, maybe not waiting for rail to prime, and possible gas quality?
 

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Started my '13 xp900 today at 5F. Started up in less than 2 sec. I turn the key to the on position, let the fuel pump cycle build pressure until it stops, and then start the engine.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Well he took his 900 to the dealer and it would not start when he left his place. He then takes it to the dealer and boom it starts. He did leave it for them to try it the next morning. The temp was about 15 below zero. He did call and they said they tried it and it starts. Kind of a funny situation. He is getting real frustrated. I have told him about all the info I have gotten from you guys and he will try the higher octane fuel. I really appriciate the info on this site it really helps a bunch.
Once again thanks
Frank
 

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Using a higher octane fuel will NOT help. The higher octane fuel is designed for for engines with higher compression to prevent premature detonation. ( :twisted: hehe premature detonation :roll: sorry having a bevis and butthead moment :lol: ) the rangers DO NOT have nearly high enough compression to warrant the higher octane fuels. If there is a water problem, use a fuel conditioner designed for the problem.
 

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Well guys mine acted up tonight. Went to the cabin to pick it up. Started OK, but not overly enthusiastic. Temp in cabin is maintained at about 35-40°f. Drove out droped corn for the deer ran around a bit so it was fully warmed up and then loaded on trailer. Trailered home, went to start, it started, fired, ran maybe 5 seconds and stalled. Refused to restart. Tried numerous times and it never seemed to even want to fire. Keyed on/off several times to prime the fuel injectors still no go. After a few minutes of jacking around with key on/off and cranking it finally decided to start.

Temp less than 20°f would be my guesstimate.

I am VERY particular about my fuel so as to avoid ethanol. In order to do this I end up running 91 octane Premium.

Seeing how it finally did start I really have to think that it's control related and not fuel related.

One thing I should note is that when I parked it there was a fair bit of snow dust in the side intake screen. It's in the shop now waiting for heater install. Once the heater is in I'll run around a bit and then park outside to test cold starts.
 

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I really don't think ethanol is a huge factor in starting in cold temperatures. My 2007 6x6 had been down for over a month in -30C due to the input bearing on the rear gearcase detonating. last week when I finally could afford to get the parts, I went out and started it. Honestly, I wasn't expecting it to even fire, but within 3 seconds it was running. I generally use the cheapest fuel that I can find, including died fuel which I know can plug up the injectors. (just throw a shot of injector cleaner in occasionally)

On a side note: in Canada it is mandatory for fuels to have at least a 5% ethanol mix. buying premium will not get around this.
 

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Ethanol will actually help with cold starting.. Since its a natural antifreeze, it will ensure your fuel lines don't freeze up. Although, anything beyond 5% can cause a problem with cold starting.
Wikipedia

Now as to using dyed fuel.. I own a small engine shop here in Edmonton that specializes in generators. If you have seen the stuff I have seen, you would never put that crap in anything you love. We have gotten generators in that were run on Red fuel for only 1 hour and the mufflers are completely plugged with carbon. We replace the muffler, replace the fuel and the units are fine. No other changes, no carb adjusting, just drain the fuel and replace. I will see if I can find some pictures cause I'm pretty sure you won't believe me till you see it.
 

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travellerwiz said:
Now as to using dyed fuel.. I own a small engine shop here in Edmonton that specializes in generators. If you have seen the stuff I have seen, you would never put that crap in anything you love. We have gotten generators in that were run on Red fuel for only 1 hour and the mufflers are completely plugged with carbon. We replace the muffler, replace the fuel and the units are fine. No other changes, no carb adjusting, just drain the fuel and replace. I will see if I can find some pictures cause I'm pretty sure you won't believe me till you see it.
You have to watch where you get your dyed fuel. in the old days they used to batch mix it with a dye powder. this would make the whole batch a consistent mix, and worked great. Now, when you purchase dyed fuel from the pump, they inject a gel dye. the only problem is that they don't premix the gel in, it comes out in slugs. If you are filling up a jerry can, pull the nozzle out and watch the fuel go from clear to dark purple and back over and over. This becomes the main problem with small engines, a lot of people get the smallest gas can that they can find, then fill up with died. That small can gets a HUGE dose of dye for the volume of fuel, and can't properly disperse through-out. When purchasing dyed fuel ALWAYS get a minimum of 5 gal.

I am lucky, when I get fuel delivered directly to the farm, the delivery driver "hand dyes" the fuel (meaning that he writes down that dye was added but really wasn't :wink: )
 

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I don't think there's anything you're going to be able to do to remedy the start problem. this issue is most likely all about how polaris has the fuel and air mapped out in the ECM, or, lack thereof :roll:

You shouldn't need to take any special steps to cold start a FI engine. it should be effortless. every FI machine should have a "cold mode"programmed into the ECM with preset fuel mapping for cold weather. just like a choke on a carbed machine. this is dissapointing to hear that there's more than one machine that's doing this, and the lack of support from and to the dealer.
 

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The one time my 800 was hard to start it was very flooded, I held it WOT and cranked the heck out of it and it fired and ran after a couple revs.
This was after several key cycles and near starts, I would assume the ecm on these things are very simple unlike automotive ones.
 

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Mine never acted flooded. One wildcard here is that it still should have a fair portion of the gas that was put in by the selling dealer. Any gas that I added to top it up was ethanol free, treated with Sta-Bil, and stored very briefly in my air sealed No-spill cans. My servicing dealer is different from my selling dealer. He suggested gas icing so I'll take his advice and treat my gas. Machine is now inside high and dry.

My larger Honda generator had been sitting with same recipe gas for at least 3-4 years and fired up perfectly first pull (battery dead) although this was warm weather.

I'm not really convinced that this is a gas issue. I have never had an issue with my chainsaws etc and I run them in teh cold all the time. My old 700 always started as well although it lacked confidence when cranking. My guess is that there is something electrical or programming related that is hanging it up.

The gas in question is from a different station than I normally use (Cenex) but servicing dealer knows the station and trusts the gas.
 

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Just got back from a Ice fishing trip to Ontario, couple of observations:

1. Monday 15-F, turned key waited for fuel rail to pressurize, started up no prob
2. Tuesday 24-F, again followed same procedure, started up no prob
3 Wednesday 15-F, turned key without letting fuel rail pressurize, had to crank over time and time again.... Started eventually...
4. Thurday 8-F, turned key waited for fuel rail to pressurize, started up no prob

Always a big beliver Non-oxgenated 91 octain, never run this Ethenal blended fuels in any gas engines.... Except my vehicel which I go thru a tank in 3 days.

Was happy with the way it started...

One thing I did notice was the air intake was getting clogged with snow, I'm wondering in turn if the air cleaner is getting iced up on some of these machines and causing issues???

Scott
 

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I live in North Dakota. Saturday morning it was -24f below. The 900 ranger started up has soon has i hit the key. The heater fan made some noise but the engine ran smooth. Went ice fishing all day. The heater has all my friends amazed that it can keep the cab that warm and all the widows open at -24 to -10 below while driving 55mph down the road.The more i drive this machine the more i love it. This is a ice fishing machine and has everybody wishing they had 1.
 
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