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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have read nearly all the electrical posts and just can't seem to find the information I am really seeking. I have yet to tear into the dash or add any accessories except a set of Rigid Dually Spots that are yet to be wired but are mounted. I have received my Blue Seas fuse block yesterday and going to start mounting it this weekend. My question is, how are people powering their switches when using a relay. I am going to hook my relay up after my fuse block to the lights but are people also pulling the power from the fuse block for the switch? Will each accessory that uses a relay take up two posts on my fuse block? Or are people pulling power for the switch from somewhere under the dash? Before I jump into this project I want to formulate a plan and construct a wiring harness for future plans of light bar, rear floods, winch, etc. Thank in advance for the advice.
 

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I relayed my fuse block and didn't relay the small stuff between the switch and the accessories unless the accessory pulled to much juice for the switch to handle. Hope that helps a little.
 

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I'm trying to figure out how to power from my blue sea to my switches power that is turned on and off from the swtich to light up the switch lights. I think I seen somewhere where some one posted they had switch power on one side the blue sea and battery power constant hot on the other side.. Hopefully we will know. Like the person said above the only time I'm putting a really between the blue sea and the switch is for my winch switch and my led light bar the rest won't draw enough to need a relay
 

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You can pull your switch power from the fuse box (I am assuming you are talking about powering the indicator lights in the switch) or from the factory terminal block under the hood. The switch lights only use a miniscule amount of power so you could even put it on the same terminal of your fuse block that your Dually's are on. Personally, I would use the factory terminal block.
 

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That's exactly what I was needing to know ! Thanks for all your help
 

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I'm trying to figure out how to power from my blue sea to my switches power that is turned on and off from the swtich to light up the switch lights. I think I seen somewhere where some one posted they had switch power on one side the blue sea and battery power constant hot on the other side.. Hopefully we will know. Like the person said above the only time I'm putting a really between the blue sea and the switch is for my winch switch and my led light bar the rest won't draw enough to need a relay
i learned the hard way. If they draw anything it will slowly kill you battery. The only way to get away with a draw on your bike is if you ride everyday. Mine sits for days and 30 milliamperes draw will mess you up if your not riding every day. 50
milliamperes is ok for a car, because you drive it everyday. After about 3 weeks of me not riding my battery would be too weak to run any accessories on my bike. It was surely a headache for me. I fixed it by putting a heavy duty on/off switch under my passenger seat going to my bus bar. So when I am riding I have my hot all the time stuff on my bus bar and my keyed stuff on my fuseblock.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Please correct me if I am out in left field. My plan is to wire my battery to a circuit breaker instead of a fuse and then to my fuse block. That circuit breaker will get its command power on from the terminal that goes hot under the hood. Then ground my fuse block back to the battery. Now with the fuse block in place it will now act as my power source. I plan on buying contura x rocker switches to match the factory look of things. So for instance my main reason for a relay instead of just going off the fuse block is an led light bar. So after my fuse panel I would hook a relay in with the power from fuse to terminal 30. The power wire from light bar to terminal 87 and then the ground wire to the neg bus of the fuse block. This completing my power circuit to the light. correct? Now for the command side of the relay is where I think of many different ways to find power and ground but I want the best way or the way that a store bought harness would be. Would I piggy back my Terminal 85 ground with the light bar ground to hook to same neg terminal on fuse block? And would I also piggy back my switch power wire off the same terminal that powers the relays terminal 87? Also the switches have a light that is independently wired I am assuming always on? Where do you pull this power from?

On the switch power and relay power is it good to use same terminal or separate making each accessory being one switch and one light use not one spot on the fuse block but two?

I am trying to use all fuse block power to avoid hacking factory harnesses and making the fuse block the key hot.
 

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I may be misunderstanding what you are saying. A circuit breaker has an 'in' and an 'out', there is no command terminal. Did you mean a relay rather than a CB? If you want everything off the fuse block to be keyed hot, the simplest way to do that is:
1. Run a cable from the + term of your battery to a fuse or circuit breaker
2. Run a cable from the fuse (or CB) to a relay (terminal #30)
3. Run a cable from the relay, (terminal #87) to the input lug on your fuse box
4. Run a smaller wire from the relay (terminal #86) to the "Keyed Hot" terminal on your factory bus bar
5. Run a smaller wire from the relay (terminal #85) to ground (again using the factory bus bar if it wired--center stud)
6. Run an uninterrupted cable from the neg post on your battery directly to the bus bar neg lug
Everywhere I said "cable", 6ga is a good choice -- some folks use 8ga but you are limited to a total draw out of your fuse box of 45 amps (6ga gives you 61amps)
For the wires for steps 4 and 5, I would use 14ga but 16ga or even 18ga would work also.

TIP:
Instead of using a Bosch type relay, it's a heck of a lot easier to use one of these instead: http://www.amazon.com/PAC-PAC-80-80...UTF8&qid=1427072394&sr=8-2&keywords=pac+relay

For your light bar and other accessories that use a relay;
1. Run a wire from the fuse box to terminal #30 on your relay (match the gauge of the wire to the wire in step 2 below)
2. Connect your power wire (usually red) to terminal #87 of your relay
3. Connect your ground wire (usually black) from your light bar to one of the ground lugs on your fuse box, or to the center lug on your factory terminal bar, or to a chassis ground.
4. Run a smaller (14, 16, or 18ga) from either your fuse box (you can even piggy-back on same terminal in step 1) or to the Keyed Hot terminal on your factory terminal block to position #2 on your switch.
5. Run a smaller (14, 16, or 18ga) from position #3 on your switch to terminal #86 on your relay.
6. Run a smaller (14, 16, or 18ga) from either your fuse box (you can even piggy-back on same terminal in step 3) or to the ground terminal on your factory terminal block to terminal #85 on your relay. If is more convenient, you could also run that wire to ground lug (center) on the factory terminal block or to a chassis ground.
7. Run a jumper between positions #2 and #6 on your switch.
8. Run a jumper between positions #7 and #8 on your switch then from either one of those to a convenient ground.

For accessories that are less than 15 amps, you can skip the relay altogether and run the power from the accessory to position 3 on your switch then another wire from position #2 of the switch directly to the fuse box. Run the ground directly to the fuse box or other convenient ground.

TIP:
If you are installing multiple switches you can use a single power wire for all of them by running a wire to position #2 on the first switch, then piggy backing off that to position #2 of the second switch, etc. Similarly, you can do the same with your grounds by running a single wire to position #8 and #7 on the first switch, then from #7 to #8 and #7 on the second switch etc. These piggy back terminals make it easier;
Technology Sewing machine feet Metal
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I may be misunderstanding what you are saying. A circuit breaker has an 'in' and an 'out', there is no command terminal. Did you mean a relay rather than a CB? If you want everything off the fuse block to be keyed hot, the simplest way to do that is:
1. Run a cable from the + term of your battery to a fuse or circuit breaker
2. Run a cable from the fuse (or CB) to a relay (terminal #30)
3. Run a cable from the relay, (terminal #87) to the input lug on your fuse box
4. Run a smaller wire from the relay (terminal #86) to the "Keyed Hot" terminal on your factory bus bar
5. Run a smaller wire from the relay (terminal #85) to ground (again using the factory bus bar if it wired--center stud)
6. Run an uninterrupted cable from the neg post on your battery directly to the bus bar neg lug
Everywhere I said "cable", 6ga is a good choice -- some folks use 8ga but you are limited to a total draw out of your fuse box of 45 amps (6ga gives you 61amps)
For the wires for steps 4 and 5, I would use 14ga but 16ga or even 18ga would work also.

TIP:
Instead of using a Bosch type relay, it's a heck of a lot easier to use one of these instead: Amazon.com : PAC PAC-80 80-Amp Relay Battery Isolator : Vehicle Power Inverters : Electronics

For your light bar and other accessories that use a relay;
1. Run a wire from the fuse box to terminal #30 on your relay (match the gauge of the wire to the wire in step 2 below)
2. Connect your power wire (usually red) to terminal #87 of your relay
3. Connect your ground wire (usually black) from your light bar to one of the ground lugs on your fuse box, or to the center lug on your factory terminal bar, or to a chassis ground.
4. Run a smaller (14, 16, or 18ga) from either your fuse box (you can even piggy-back on same terminal in step 1) or to the Keyed Hot terminal on your factory terminal block to position #2 on your switch.
5. Run a smaller (14, 16, or 18ga) from position #3 on your switch to terminal #86 on your relay.
6. Run a smaller (14, 16, or 18ga) from either your fuse box (you can even piggy-back on same terminal in step 3) or to the ground terminal on your factory terminal block to terminal #85 on your relay. If is more convenient, you could also run that wire to ground lug (center) on the factory terminal block or to a chassis ground.
7. Run a jumper between positions #2 and #6 on your switch.
8. Run a jumper between positions #7 and #8 on your switch then from either one of those to a convenient ground.

For accessories that are less than 15 amps, you can skip the relay altogether and run the power from the accessory to position 3 on your switch then another wire from position #2 of the switch directly to the fuse box. Run the ground directly to the fuse box or other convenient ground.

TIP:
If you are installing multiple switches you can use a single power wire for all of them by running a wire to position #2 on the first switch, then piggy backing off that to position #2 of the second switch, etc. Similarly, you can do the same with your grounds by running a single wire to position #8 and #7 on the first switch, then from #7 to #8 and #7 on the second switch etc. These piggy back terminals make it easier;
View attachment 10216

fswan thank you for the information. That is exactly what I was looking for and I confused myself with the circuit breaker when I believe I meant solenoid. Would the relay be best choice due to wanting it to be key on hot. I see many pics of people running the relay and that may be just what I want to do. Would I use a 150amp fuse in front of that relay since it can take 150a surges? I would not be putting a lot of relayed accessories on but light bar and winch.
 

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fswan thank you for the information. That is exactly what I was looking for and I confused myself with the circuit breaker when I believe I meant solenoid. Would the relay be best choice due to wanting it to be key on hot. I see many pics of people running the relay and that may be just what I want to do. Would I use a 150amp fuse in front of that relay since it can take 150a surges? I would not be putting a lot of relayed accessories on but light bar and winch.
Ahhh! A solenoid never occurred to me last night (coffee had worn off!) Yes that would work - you need to get a "continuous duty" solenoid and make sure you mount it so that it is grounded. Personally, I would use the PAC 80 in the link but only because that is what I am familiar with. Exactly the same effort to wire as a solenoid, maybe a tad easier since it doesn't matter which lug you use as in and out and which trigger terminal you use as Pos and Neg. Not sure how they compare in price.

So for instance my main reason for a relay instead of just going off the fuse block is an led light bar. So after my fuse panel I would hook a relay in with the power from fuse to terminal 30. The power wire from light bar to terminal 87 and then the ground wire to the neg bus of the fuse block. This completing my power circuit to the light. correct?
Correct!
Now for the command side of the relay is where I think of many different ways to find power and ground but I want the best way or the way that a store bought harness would be. Would I piggy back my Terminal 85 ground with the light bar ground to hook to same neg terminal on fuse block? And would I also piggy back my switch power wire off the same terminal that powers the relays terminal 87?
Yes, except that the switch would go on the same lug on your as the wire that powers the relays #30 terminal or another 'bare' terminal on your fuse block.
Also the switches have a light that is independently wired I am assuming always on? Where do you pull this power from?
As I stated in last night's post,
On the switch power and relay power is it good to use same terminal or separate making each accessory being one switch and one light use not one spot on the fuse block but two?
Can do it either way, I would use a separate one for each unless you are running short of spots on your fuse box.
Would I use a 150amp fuse in front of that relay since it can take 150a surges?
I would use a 100amp fuse or CB since that is all the fuse box can stand unless you use the PAC 80, then I would use an 80 amp.
 
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For your light bar and other accessories that use a relay;
1. Run a wire from the fuse box to terminal #30 on your relay (match the gauge of the wire to the wire in step 2 below)
2. Connect your power wire (usually red) to terminal #87 of your relay
3. Connect your ground wire (usually black) from your light bar to one of the ground lugs on your fuse box, or to the center lug on your factory terminal bar, or to a chassis ground.
4. Run a smaller (14, 16, or 18ga) from either your fuse box (you can even piggy-back on same terminal in step 1) or to the Keyed Hot terminal on your factory terminal block to position #2 on your switch.
5. Run a smaller (14, 16, or 18ga) from position #3 on your switch to terminal #86 on your relay.
6. Run a smaller (14, 16, or 18ga) from either your fuse box (you can even piggy-back on same terminal in step 3) or to the ground terminal on your factory terminal block to terminal #85 on your relay. If is more convenient, you could also run that wire to ground lug (center) on the factory terminal block or to a chassis ground.
7. Run a jumper between positions #2 and #6 on your switch.
8. Run a jumper between positions #7 and #8 on your switch then from either one of those to a convenient ground.

For accessories that are less than 15 amps, you can skip the relay altogether and run the power from the accessory to position 3 on your switch then another wire from position #2 of the switch directly to the fuse box. Run the ground directly to the fuse box or other convenient ground.


View attachment 10216
Just wiring in a 20" light bar, ran wire ,12g, from battery to fuse box, per and ground, got 12.2v at block. Wired in switch, light and relay as above, when I turn on switch I get 7.7v going to light. I have checked over and over again, replaced relay and still 7.7v. What is going on, help?
 
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