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Discussion Starter #1
So. I'm looking at my old ALICE pack and decided that would fit the bill of a trail repair survival kit. I'm looking for opinions on what would be best to stuff in this for emergency repairs on the trail, what some of you have experienced and what's practical without brining 100 lbs of tools etc etc.
Also have a question about a YouTube video. I watched a video of a Ranger XP 1000 that had a major track damage while on the trail. The emergency repair was to remove the track ( right rear track ) and replaced it with one of his tires and drove back to his trailer. Would that cause damage to the transmission/ trams axle since the drive wheels of the track and wheel are different diameters?
 

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I am assembling something similar, but less for the trail and more for the road. We can ride on the roads here and there are hundreds of miles of pavement and gravel to cover, but we ride alone and there isn't cell coverage everywhere, so having stuff like this with you is just as important.

When I bought my 07 ranger 700 efi, I went through and tested every Torx screw I could find, as well as every external hex nut/bolt. In the end I found I needed only 3 sizes of Torx and I think 6 sockets for everything from taking the valve cover off to swapping a tire. I bought copies of all those and a new small tool box, and started the kit along with extensions and ratchet handles.

Other than the tools, this is what I carry:

  • Spare TPS (bought a used one on ebay, tested it)
  • The means/tools to swap and calibrate a TPS
  • Idle adjustment tool
  • Some spare wire
  • Butane powered soldering iron which is also a torch for shrink wrap (the only acceptable way to fix wiring that could be exposed to moister IMO)
  • All the stuff needed to solder (solder, flux, shrink wrap, de-soldering wick)
  • Electrical tape
  • Spare tire
  • Extra oil
  • Extra antifeeze/distilled water if it's warm there
  • Portable jump pack (one of the small ones) for dead battery
  • Extra key, and/or the means to bypass the ignition switch if needed
  • Drive belt (new oem spare) and the means to change it
  • A printed wire diagram from the manual

Because it took me no more than 30 minutes and basic tools to swap the fuel pump, I plan to carry a spare cheap/aftermarket of that as well. Really I poked around for problems that people seem to have repetitively, and tried my best to plan a roadside fix for each of them. This is my first ranger and we have only had it a little over a week so I'm sure we will be adding to it.

This seems like a lot, but it's all small stuff and everything fits easily in the under-seat storage and leaves tons of room for other stuff yet, so I think it's worth it. And when stuff breaks I can have the parts right away even if it doesn't stand me.

To answer your last question; I'm not sure, however, I looked at the manual and it describes the front/rear as diffs, so unless the diff is locked I would expect it to deal with different tire sizes (or track vs. tire sizes) without issue. This is my first Polaris, but on Honda ATV's I've ran different sized left/rights in emergencies before and those diffs had zero issue with it.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I am assembling something similar, but less for the trail and more for the road. We can ride on the roads here and there are hundreds of miles of pavement and gravel to cover, but we ride alone and there isn't cell coverage everywhere, so having stuff like this with you is just as important.

When I bought my 07 ranger 700 efi, I went through and tested every Torx screw I could find, as well as every external hex nut/bolt. In the end I found I needed only 3 sizes of Torx and I think 6 sockets for everything from taking the valve cover off to swapping a tire. I bought copies of all those and a new small tool box, and started the kit along with extensions and ratchet handles.

Other than the tools, this is what I carry:

  • Spare TPS (bought a used one on ebay, tested it)
  • The means/tools to swap and calibrate a TPS
  • Idle adjustment tool
  • Some spare wire
  • Butane powered soldering iron which is also a torch for shrink wrap (the only acceptable way to fix wiring that could be exposed to moister IMO)
  • All the stuff needed to solder (solder, flux, shrink wrap, de-soldering wick)
  • Electrical tape
  • Spare tire
  • Extra oil
  • Extra antifeeze/distilled water if it's warm there
  • Portable jump pack (one of the small ones) for dead battery
  • Extra key, and/or the means to bypass the ignition switch if needed
  • Drive belt (new oem spare) and the means to change it
  • A printed wire diagram from the manual

Because it took me no more than 30 minutes and basic tools to swap the fuel pump, I plan to carry a spare cheap/aftermarket of that as well. Really I poked around for problems that people seem to have repetitively, and tried my best to plan a roadside fix for each of them. This is my first ranger and we have only had it a little over a week so I'm sure we will be adding to it.

This seems like a lot, but it's all small stuff and everything fits easily in the under-seat storage and leaves tons of room for other stuff yet, so I think it's worth it. And when stuff breaks I can have the parts right away even if it doesn't stand me.

To answer your last question; I'm not sure, however, I looked at the manual and it describes the front/rear as diffs, so unless the diff is locked I would expect it to deal with different tire sizes (or track vs. tire sizes) without issue. This is my first Polaris, but on Honda ATV's I've ran different sized left/rights in emergencies before and those diffs had zero issue with it.
Awesome tool kit. I need to familarize myself with TPS as i know nothing about it.
 

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Awesome tool kit. I need to familarize myself with TPS as i know nothing about it.
Yeah it's different than what I've worked on previously but it isn't impossible to do quickly if you're setup right for it. Not sure if your machine has similar problems, but it seemed like a common topic for my year/model so it made the kit.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I just rece
Yeah it's different than what I've worked on previously but it isn't impossible to do quickly if you're setup right for it. Not sure if your machine has similar problems, but it seemed like a common topic for my year/model so it made the kit.
I just recently bought a 2021 Ranger XP 1000. Im new to the utv crowd and really appreciate all of you on this forum. Lots of good info and people willing to share it. Im going to add radiator repair tape and a bottle jack
 

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When I first read your reply I thought you said a bottle of Jack. I think there's room for both
 

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What do you need to do if you break an axle? Tie it up with wire? Or does it need to be popped off so it doesn't flail around?
 

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When I first read your reply I thought you said a bottle of Jack. I think there's room for both
No room for Jack. George Dickel or Wild Turkey 101, maybe. :D

The list seems to be missing compass, phone charger, fire starter, first aid kit, vise grips, tie wraps, hatchet, knife, and flashlight or head lamp.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
No room for Jack. George Dickel or Wild Turkey 101, maybe. :D

The list seems to be missing compass, phone charger, fire starter, first aid kit, vise grips, tie wraps, hatchet, knife, and flashlight or head lamp.
Nope. The bug out bag is seperate then the emergency repair kit. Got that covered.
 

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What do you need to do if you break an axle? Tie it up with wire? Or does it need to be popped off so it doesn't flail around?
Good question. I haven't been through a Polaris front or rear diff yet but from the manual I can tell you that removing the axle will at least cause the fluid to drain, and it looks like you will have bearing issues as well. Based on what I see I don't think removing it is an option on my model. I've had to wire a broken half-shaft out of the way to limp home once on another brand ATV, and it sucked, but I made it. It would have been better if I would have had some way to cut the remaining part of the axle off close to the diff to prevent it from flailing, so long as it's held in some way
 
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