PRC Polaris Ranger Club banner
1 - 20 of 99 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
68 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just acquired a 2009 Ranger 700 XP Camo from my buddy for super cheap ($150). It hasn't ran for almost a year though. It currently shows 910 hours on the display. Is that considered a lot for the year? I'm new to these machines so have lots to learn. I started troubleshooting it this past weekend. Fuel pump was not kicking on and got a error code 41 on the display which lead me to the TBAP wire harness. One of the wires was broken and the others are a little damaged as well. I ordered a new harness from OTB Powersports.

I decided to remove the fuel pump to inspect it and see what the fuel looked like inside the tank and it was bad. The fuel pump was very corroded and the fuel in the tank was dirty. Pulled the tank out and cleaned it out, I also ordered a new fuel pump from amazon.

I'd like to replace the spark plugs, it currently has some Champion RC7YC3 plugs installed. Are these still good to run or should I switch to some NGK 4644 plugs? Any advice and guidance would be much appreciated. Thanks.





 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
7,761 Posts
  • Like
Reactions: StinkerBean

·
Registered
Joined
·
68 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks, I’ll definitely go that route. For some reason the oil dip stick is stuck. I can lift the lever and it will only pull out just a tad bit. Have any idea what could be going on? I haven’t tried giving it a hard pull yet. Don’t want to mess anything up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,651 Posts
Thanks, I’ll definitely go that route. For some reason the oil dip stick is stuck. I can lift the lever and it will only pull out just a tad bit. Have any idea what could be going on? I haven’t tried giving it a hard pull yet. Don’t want to mess anything up.
Some catch like that. Give it a quick sharp pull and it'll come out.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
7,761 Posts
Be sure to check that black canister filter above the fuel pump . They ALL get plugged and crack. Here is the cure ...

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
68 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Be sure to check that black canister filter above the fuel pump . They ALL get plugged and crack. Here is the cure ...

If I'm replacing the entire fuel pump assembly with a Quantum 2204306 will I still need to check the black canister?
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
7,761 Posts
  • Like
Reactions: StinkerBean

·
Administrator
Joined
·
7,761 Posts
Stink, goldish color oil only with a WIX filter .

 
  • Like
Reactions: StinkerBean

·
Registered
Joined
·
68 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 · (Edited)
Update. Installed the new fuel pump and TBAP wire harness. Engine still doesn’t turn on and no more codes. I checked for spark with a spark plug tester and it was good. I can hear the fuel pump priming. I disconnected the fuel line that goes to the engine to make sure fuel was coming out and it was. I don’t have a fuel pressure gauge to test pressure at the moment. I cleaned the TBAP sensor and tried spraying starting fluid into the intake with the air filter removed and no luck.

I plan on purchasing a compression tester to check compression. What's the proper way of doing the compression test? Do I remove both plugs first or do one at a time? Do I need to keep the gas pedal pressed down when doing the test? Can I do this test with the engine cold? Any advice and guidance would be much appreciated.
 

·
Registered
2015 Polaris ranger 570 XP
Joined
·
3,996 Posts
I personally view compression tests as only a "quick look" diagnostic tool. There isn't a lot of difference in price between a good compression tester and a good cylinder leak down tester. If I were going to have only one diagnostic tool for checking engine health it would be a cylinder leak down tester because it not only provides a percentage of leakage of the cylinder it also assists in finding where the problem lies, i.e. rings, leaking valves, head gasket, etc. The caveat is that you need an air compressor capable of working the tester. A compressor that puts out 5 CFM is probably sufficient in most cases. You don't need a lot of CFM is you don't have a large engine (big diesel for example) or large leaks. You will need the ability to hold 120 PSI.
The short story on the methods cylinder leak testers can be used to locate sources follows:
After applying air pressure to the cylinder in accordance with tester instructions you can listen at the air intake (carburetor/throttle body) and muffler outlet for sounds of escaping air. If found valves are leaking (clearance, carbon, burned seats). Remove oil fill cal and listen for high volume of leakage. Low volume is normal (all rings leak a little). Remove radiator cap and look for bubbles (head gasket). Apply soapy water around outside of engine at cylinder head,cylinder interface and look for bubbles (head gasket). Apply soapy water at any suspected areas of leakage on engine surfaces (checking for cracks).
If you choose to go with a compression tester remove both plugs, set throttle plate to wide open position carb or throttle body), choke off if carbureted. Tests are more accureate when engine is warm but that isn't a possibility if you can't get it running. Be sure battery is fully charged to get proper cranking speed.
 
  • Like
Reactions: StinkerBean

·
Registered
Joined
·
68 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Thanks, couple of other questions I just thought about. When cracking the engine over with everything still intact should the plugs be wet or dry if I removed them right after? I'm wondering if the fuel injectors are working. Can I remove the injectors from the engine while still attached to the fuel rail and turn the key on to see if they are pumping out fuel?
 

·
Registered
2015 Polaris ranger 570 XP
Joined
·
3,996 Posts
If the engine won't run and the plugs are dry you probably aren't getting fuel into the cylinders. Open the throttle place and shoot a little carb cleaner into the intake manifold and crank. If it fires off and dies fuel is at least part of the problem.
Wet plugs would indicate either no spark or flooding (too much fuel).
I believe you could remove the fuel rail and injectors and test out of the engine but I've not done that.
 
  • Like
Reactions: StinkerBean

·
Registered
Joined
·
68 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
If the engine won't run and the plugs are dry you probably aren't getting fuel into the cylinders. Open the throttle place and shoot a little carb cleaner into the intake manifold and crank. If it fires off and dies fuel is at least part of the problem.
Wet plugs would indicate either no spark or flooding (too much fuel).
I believe you could remove the fuel rail and injectors and test out of the engine but I've not done that.
Do you mean to remove the air intake tube that attaches to the throttle body, open the throttle and spray some carb cleaner in there then try to start it? Not sure if I'm understanding you correctly on carb cleaner into the intake manifold.
 

·
Registered
2015 Polaris ranger 570 XP
Joined
·
3,996 Posts
Do you mean to remove the air intake tube that attaches to the throttle body, open the throttle and spray some carb cleaner in there then try to start it? Not sure if I'm understanding you correctly on carb cleaner into the intake manifold.
Yes, exactly. Spray carb spray directly into the throttle body with the throttle plate open and try to fire it up. If it pops off and dies it's a fuel problem.
What you are doing is providing fuel directly, bypassing the normal fuel system. The carb spray is the fuel.
 
  • Like
Reactions: StinkerBean
1 - 20 of 99 Posts
Top