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Discussion Starter #1
Hello friends,
I am not new to powersports, but I am brand new to owning a machine with Turf Mode. As I understand it, "turf mode" simply opens the rear diff, making it like a normal live diff - which means that in low-traction scenarios it'll do a one-wheel-peel. This would also allow the inside tire to turn slower and not "scrub" while turning.
So...I'm not looking for guidance as to what it's for, but rather is it possible to break something or ruin something because of the design? For example, I live in AZ, which means I do street legal and cruise the asphalt a lot. I intend to use turf mode while cruising around town, and even most forest roads. I wouldn't use the center setting (locked rear diff) until I get into lower-traction or more technical terrain. I've already tested Turf Mode around the hills and trails near my home and this machine seems to do everything fine so far in turf mode.
From your experience...are there any things I need to do or not do in order to preserve the rear diff? I remember seeing/hearing that the Generals have turf mode issues.
 

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Think they have addressed some of the weakness in the 2020 but most don't have problems till you start making mods, lifts, bigger tires and such but even then most can be found as a direct result of the right foot. Also when searching for problems remember that Polaris outsells their nearest 6 competitors combined, more units the more you'll see issues, it's simply in the numbers. 2016/900 turf mode 99% of the time, 3500miles mainly hard roads with no problems.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Think they have addressed some of the weakness in the 2020 but most don't have problems till you start making mods, lifts, bigger tires and such but even then most can be found as a direct result of the right foot. Also when searching for problems remember that Polaris outsells their nearest 6 competitors combined, more units the more you'll see issues, it's simply in the numbers. 2016/900 turf mode 99% of the time, 3500miles mainly hard roads with no problems.
Awesome! Thank you for the info, and it's good to see that you've been running turf mode 99% of the time in your 900 without issues. I do not intend to "rod" this machine, but it will be getting a mild lift with bigger tires. Overall it will be used at light-medium throttle. Time will tell!
 

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I also use turf when driving normal around and when no need for more traction. Instead of the locked 2wd mode I wish it was an 4wd mode with open diffs both front and rear. Would have been fine on winter roads.
 

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AsPede states, the weakness of Turf Mode portion of the gear case is supposed to have been addressed, the outcome is not time tested.
No matter how strong the parts are or whether the fix is great, using Turf mode on hard surfaces is good practice. Doing so reduces load on axles, gears and other components. Like the other posters above, I use Turf Mode 99% of the time, in fact closer to 99.8% of the time since I installed the SVI Traction Control which allows me to engage the front wheels while still in Turf mode in the rear.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I also use turf when driving normal around and when no need for more traction. Instead of the locked 2wd mode I wish it was an 4wd mode with open diffs both front and rear. Would have been fine on winter roads.
Thank you for the response. This is likely what I will do.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
AsPede states, the weakness of Turf Mode portion of the gear case is supposed to have been addressed, the outcome is not time tested.
No matter how strong the parts are or whether the fix is great, using Turf mode on hard surfaces is good practice. Doing so reduces load on axles, gears and other components. Like the other posters above, I use Turf Mode 99% of the time, in fact closer to 99.8% of the time since I installed the SVI Traction Control which allows me to engage the front wheels while still in Turf mode in the rear.
Awesome! Thank you for your response. I’m happy about the report that “Turf Mode” issues were addressed by Polaris, and because I’m mechanically inclined, it just feels better knowing that I’m not putting the added stress on the drivetrain when the diff is open.
 

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Me too. 2016 Ranger 900 XP 4,736 miles with 99% turf mode and no problems.
 

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If your worried about breakage why would you want the extra stress of over sized tires? I’m on the fence like you. I’m thinking of ( and this may sound stupid) but weighing tire rim assembly of stock unit and finding a rim tire assembly that is a little bigger but close to stock weight . by the way your Ranger is sweeet!
 

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Discussion Starter #13
If your worried about breakage why would you want the extra stress of over sized tires? I’m on the fence like you. I’m thinking of ( and this may sound stupid) but weighing tire rim assembly of stock unit and finding a rim tire assembly that is a little bigger but close to stock weight . by the way your Ranger is sweeet!
Like you, I’m not a fan of heavy wheels/tires on my machines. But, I do need a few inches additional ground clearance for some of the areas we will ride. We rode for hours today without dragging once! But there are other places we go that require just a little more. That’s really all I’m after. Let me know what you settle on!
 

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At best your going to gain 2 or 3in's and with that comes the potential for axle/differential/tranny/clutch problems. I might suggest a different route; move you rear shocks to the outer upper mounting holes that will gain 1-2in, then and not sure you can find them but get a set of self leveling shocks, Polaris use to have Novex(spelling?) shocks, expensive but will maintain ground clearance regardless of load. I've got a 09/700 with them and even with 8000 miles it has better clearance then my 16/900.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
At best your going to gain 2 or 3in's and with that comes the potential for axle/differential/tranny/clutch problems. I might suggest a different route; move you rear shocks to the outer upper mounting holes that will gain 1-2in, then and not sure you can find them but get a set of self leveling shocks, Polaris use to have Novex(spelling?) shocks, expensive but will maintain ground clearance regardless of load. I've got a 09/700 with them and even with 8000 miles it has better clearance then my 16/900.
Thank you for the suggestion. I’ll have a look at those shocks.
 

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Like you, I’m not a fan of heavy wheels/tires on my machines. But, I do need a few inches additional ground clearance for some of the areas we will ride. We rode for hours today without dragging once! But there are other places we go that require just a little more. That’s really all I’m after. Let me know what you settle on!
I, too, am not big on heavy large diameter tires and wheels, but I needed a little extra ground clearance. I chose arched A Arms all around, a 2" lift and 6 ply 26" tires on my stock wheels. Tire/wheel weight and diameter are close to stock, but I got the clearance I needed. The caveat is that when installing a lift and arched forward A arms you have to add spacers to the steering if you use stock driveshafts becasue the CVs may bind at extreme suspension travel during turns. The spacers increase turning radius which is objectionable. The solution is aftermarket driveshafts that have increased angle capabilities to allow more angle without binding. This adds expense to the modifications.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I, too, am not big on heavy large diameter tires and wheels, but I needed a little extra ground clearance. I chose arched A Arms all around, a 2" lift and 6 ply 26" tires on my stock wheels. Tire/wheel weight and diameter are close to stock, but I got the clearance I needed. The caveat is that when installing a lift and arched forward A arms you have to add spacers to the steering if you use stock driveshafts becasue the CVs may bind at extreme suspension travel during turns. The spacers increase turning radius which is objectionable. The solution is aftermarket driveshafts that have increased angle capabilities to allow more angle without binding. This adds expense to the modifications.
How do you know when your axles are binding? Yesterday on two separate occasions, when a front tire was off the ground at full extension (due to off-camber terrain) I heard a very loud pop come from the front of the machine. Wondering if that could be a sign of said axle binding.
 

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How do you know when your axles are binding? Yesterday on two separate occasions, when a front tire was off the ground at full extension (due to off-camber terrain) I heard a very loud pop come from the front of the machine. Wondering if that could be a sign of said axle binding.
Jack up the front end so the wheels are at full extension with the vehicle in neutral, turn the front wheels to full lock in each direction and try to rotate the front wheels by hand while the wheels are turned full lock in each direction. You will be able to feel binding as you rotate the wheel/tire assembly.
All you are really doing is trying to duplicate the extreme travel of the suspension and steering while checking for binding at those extremes.
If you do not have a lift and/or forward arched A arms and you experienced the "pop" you described the problem likely is elsewhere unless your CV joints are bad. Other possibilities are propeller shaft splines that are worn or lack lubricant or a chassis with fractures. Recently there have been members who posted about having troubles with cracked frames where the front differential mounts. Movement there could cause noises.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Jack up the front end so the wheels are at full extension with the vehicle in neutral, turn the front wheels to full lock in each direction and try to rotate the front wheels by hand while the wheels are turned full lock in each direction. You will be able to feel binding as you rotate the wheel/tire assembly.
All you are really doing is trying to duplicate the extreme travel of the suspension and steering while checking for binding at those extremes.
If you do not have a lift and/or forward arched A arms and you experienced the "pop" you described the problem likely is elsewhere unless your CV joints are bad. Other possibilities are propeller shaft splines that are worn or lack lubricant or a chassis with fractures. Recently there have been members who posted about having troubles with cracked frames where the front differential mounts. Movement there could cause noises.
Thanks! I’ll do that. The machine is brand new and stock. This was our first ride.
 

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I run in turf mode 95% of the time everywhere. BUT when I get in sand or loose rocks / gravel or climb hills I switch to 4x4 mode. When just general trail riding I will switch to 2 wheel mode if there is a considerable amount of loose surface. The Polaris is a most capable machine and will do just about anything you ask of it. Using turf mode or 2x4 mode in the wrong situation could cost you a belt or worse,
 
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